Personality

Design for Assessment or Development

We specialise in personality test design. Hence, we offer both personality designs for assessment and for development purposes.

Personality Test Design Publishers

We are not aligned with a particular test publisher. Thus, we can offer an independent perspective on any personality questionnaire design. Whilst we recommend designing bespoke personality tests, we can also advise on the most commonly used, off-the-shelf personality tests. These are listed below: firstly as general personality questionnaires; and then as personality questionnaires with specific applications.

General Personality Test Designs

  • SHL’s Occupational Personality Questionnaire (the 32-scale OPQ).
  • Kenexa’s OPI.
  • OPP’s 16PF5 Personality Questionnaire, MBTI Step I, MBTI Step II and the California Personality Inventory.
  • Saville Consulting’s Wave Styles.
  • Talent Q’s Dimensions.

Specific Personality Test Designs

  • Hogan Development Survey (de-railers)
  • Kenexa and SHL’s Motivation Questionnaires
  • FIRO-B (relationship building)
  • MBTI for Teams (team relationships) and MBTI for Coaching
  • EJI and EIQ (emotional intelligence measures)
  • Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode (conflict management)
  • SHL’s Corporate Culture Questionnaire and Customer Contact Styles Questionnaire

Personality Test Projects

As well as offering access to the most widely used personality questionnaires, Rob Williams also has extensive experience of personality questionnaire design.

In other words, personality questionnaires that have a psychometric design that is bespoke to a specific client/job role/industry or sector.

Bespoke Personality Questionnaire Design

In our opinion, the typical stages of such a personality questionnaire design project should be:

Firstly, investigate the job role(s) using the most appropriate types of job analysis.

Secondly, study the job analysis results to determine the personality areas or competencies that measure effective work performance within this particular context.

Thirdly, you have what you need to write questions for each personality area or competency.

Thus, you are able to produce a trial personality questionnaire and deliver this to a representative sample of current employees in the role(s).

Now, you can determine the best way to validate the questionnaire: (a) For example, using performance data such as sales figures, or appraisal ratings. (b) Designing a performance rating form for completion by managers of the sample group.

Next, produce scoring keys for the personality questionnaire scales.

Then, trial the personality questionnaire alongside the performance rating form.

Next, analyse the trial data and validation data to determine the personality scales and specific questions that are most predictive of work performance.

Finally, produce the final questionnaire, norm tables and scoring key.

Practice aptitude test tips books 

Firstly, Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests book.

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Secondly, our Passing Numerical reasoning Tests book.

Personality tests research 2019


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