Situational Judgement Test Practice

In our opinion this is the best page you will find for situational judgement test practice resources. Plus, of course, all of our practice resources are free!

Situational Judgement Test Practice 

If you are applying for a management position in a large company it is common for employers to ask candidates to sit a numerical, verbal or diagrammatic reasoning test. It is also common for assessors to use situational judgement tests and also personality tests. The level of difficulty of each is dependent on the role.

Situational judgment test introduction

In our opinion, situational judgment test presents realistic scenarios similar to those that would be encountered when doing a particular job. By using real life scenarios, the idea is that employers will get a better understanding of how you might operate in the work place.

These measure those skills of judgment and evaluation which are vital to any managerial role. Role-specific competencies will be measured, typically customer service, communication and teamwork.

Note, that this other important competencies will depend upon the sector or level of role the manager is applying for.

Think in advance of the highest priority criteria: which could be commercial awareness, planning/organising, maintaining an ethical approach.

Note, that this is important since when you are presented with an SJT scenario you must “judge” the Best and Worst response to that scenario within that specific work context.

Situational judgment tips

Firstly, identify which 3-4 factors need to be considered in your decision-making. For example: time, money and quality impact upon many business decisions.

Secondly, judge the Best response to be the one that addresses all these factors. It’s advisable to answer as the most ethical employee.

In our opinion, firstly if two of the answer options are very similar then it’s unlikely that either one is the Best or Worst answer. For example, a short-term fix to the SJT scenario would only be half-right.

In our opinion, secondly you need to select an answer option with a longer-term, vcomplete solution.

Dilemmas series from our partner PSI

Graduate Dilemmas

To assess the most relevant graduates to take through to assessment centre and / or to interview.

Administrative Dilemmas

For admin, clerical and secretarial roles.

Customer Service Dilemmas

To assess face-to-face customer service skills.

Call Centre Dilemmas

Find those who can deliver excellent call centre sales and customer service skills.

Management Dilemmas

To assess the most or to develop more effective managers.

Situational judgment test examples 

You have two very important deadlines to meet by the end of your working day. However it is becoming clear in your final two hours of working that you are in danger of missing both deadlines?

You are then asked to select your most preferred and least preferred responses:

(a) Work out what’s left to do and then prioritise the critical tasks for the time remaining.

(b) Focus on still doing a quality job even if you must miss a deadline.

(c) Speed up your remaining tasks so that you will still be able to meet both deadlines.

(d) Aim to achieve one deadline and to renegotiate the delivery date for the other.

In this instance, the best response is (a) Work out what’s left to do and then prioritise the critical tasks for the time remaining. The worst response is (b) Focus on still doing a quality job even if you must miss a deadline. The best outcome is to meet the deadline after making a considered judgement call. Missing the important deadline is the worst outcome. 

Situational judgment test examples Part II

Commonly featured as a graduate recruitment sift, along with numerical reasoning and verbal reasoning tests, the SJT has several advantages:

  • SJTs are a highly effective means of measuring an applicant’s competency behaviours – i.e., the characteristics that determine how they behave in certain areas.
  • SJTs are a fair test of how the candidate would solve a job’s daily challenges.
  • SJT questions can be designed around a specific role. Because SJTs are bespoke, candidates rate them highly as a valid application stage. In fact, there is a type of SJT called a realistic job preview which is used solely to give job applicants a realistic preview of a role.

Situational judgment test examples Part III

If you have a job description or a detailed job advert this will probably tell you some, or all, of the role’s competency behaviours. These are the abilities and skills you need to demonstrate when completing the SJT.

Situational judgment tests typically measure problem solving skills, team working, leadership/managerial abilities and, if applicable, customer service skills. Employers are looking for someone who has the necessary job characteristics and skills.

You’ve a couple of key deadlines to finish by close of play. It’s 4pm now and you could easily miss both deadlines?

What’s your Most Preferred and Your Least Preferred action to take next?

(a) Work out what’s left to do and then prioritise the critical tasks for the time remaining.

(b) Focus on still doing a quality job even if you must miss a deadline.

(c) Speed up your remaining tasks so that you will still be able to meet both deadlines.

(d) Aim to achieve one deadline and to renegotiate the delivery date for the second one.

Situational Judgement Test Explained Answer:

Your Most Suitable response should have been:

Work out what’s left to do and then prioritise the critical tasks for the time remaining. Since the best outcome is to meet the deadline after making a considered judgement call. Whereas, missing any key deadline must be the worst overall outcome.

Your Least Suitable response should have been:

Focus on still doing a quality job even if you must miss a deadline. 

Passing situational judgement tests

  • Each SJT scenario will measure one of these competencies based on both the best and worst answers, so focus on getting both correct. You won’t need to get every question right, however scoring low on any given competency will detract from your overall SJT score.
  • Each SJT scenario requires you to make an effective judgment. This will involve prioritising which aspects of the scenario are most important to fix first. Identifying and addressing this vital element of each scenario is the key to passing a situational judgment test. Any answer option that does not move the scenario situation forward will not be the correct “Best” action to take. The “Worst” answer option will be one that makes the situation even worse.
  • While several answer options may seem like a sufficient solution in the short-term, you shouldn’t be looking for a quick and easy stop-gap solution. The “Best” solution will always be the one that actually solves the problem. You need to identify a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits.

Passing situational judgement tests Part II

  • Be your most ethical self when taking an SJT. Any answer option that is slightly unethical or dishonest to anyone involved will not be the correct answer. Look for the most virtuous answer if there is one – demonstrating respect for others, integrity and conscientiousness.
  • Logically, the “Best” and “Worst” answers need to be distinct from the other answer options. Check if two answer options seem very similar to you. Tt’s likely these are the “distractor” answer options and neither the best – or the worst – answer.

– See more at: What you need to know about situational judgement tests

Example taxi driver Uber situational judgement test

It’s early morning and you are chatting with your colleague drivers. A colleague jokes they were out late at a party and feel a bit shaky this morning. Do you…?

a) Report your colleague to the authorities

b) Advise your colleague to drive carefully

c) Stop your colleague from getting into their cab

Police situational judgement test practice

The manager of a large luxury clothing store is compleining to you about the large amount of theft from teenagers. This is the third time today you’ve been in this situation. Should you…?

a) Empathise with the manager and offer your help

b) Explain that now the police are involved, the thieves will be caught

c) Point out that other stores have similar problems

Example Civil Service situational judgement test practice 

You’ve been leading your project team on a very challenging project for six months. For the second time this week, one of your closest colleagues has asked to speak to you privately. He says that he’s suffering from stress after finding the project commitments exhausting.

a) Explain his role responsibilities

b) Offer to make changes to his job role

c) Suggest that he goes to see a doctor

Example Fire Service situational judgement test practice

You’re attending a traffic accident when you are approached by an onlooker. They say they’d like to help and ask you what has happened. Would you…?

a) Insist they step aside and allow you to do your job

b) Request that they stick close behind you

c) Promise that you will get back to them later

Example Fire Service SJT item II

You are at a meeting with your fellow managers discussing an incident which took place a couple of days ago. Although the incident was well handled, you have some concerns about the new procedures that have been introduced. Even though you feel you briefed your team on the new procedures they seemed to have difficulty knowing what to do at crucial times during the incident.

You should practise situational judgment test questions like this

Practising psychometric test questions is known to significantly improve your chances of passing a verbal reasoning test. Try to squeeze in as much advance practice as possible so you can to improve your confidence and keep a clear head on the day. Continually review what you have learnt from practice situational judgement test sessions so that you use your time most effectively.

When should I do my situational judgement test practise?

First think about how much time you can spare for practising situational judgement test questions. Then set aside the time so you can conduct as many practice situational judgement test sessions as possible over a period of several weeks or months. Set aside a particular time of day or week when your mind is most alert. You will improve your SJT performance the most if you undertake several practice sessions instead of one big one. At first it may seem as if you are only making small gains, but these small gains will soon add up to improved situational judgement test-taking skills.

You need this much situational judgment test practice

That depends on why you are taking the test and your current skill level. Your situational judgement test may be a key to a new job or a new stage in your life. It’s always worth maximising your situational judgement test practice opportunities when your future is at stake.

Where should I start my situational judgement test practice?

If you don’t already know exactly what type of situational judgement test you will be taking, you should find out as your first step. Knowing what to expect on your test day will give you a big advantage, so learn as much as you can about the test you are going to take. Your recruiting organisation may send you practice situational judgement test examples in advance of your SJT. This may be in the form of sample situational judgement test questions, either online or in printed format. The information should also outline why the test is being used in the process and – most importantly – the exact nature of the test that you will be taking on the day.

This situational judgement test practice opportunity levels the playing field and gives everyone a fair chance – particularly important for people who have not taken a situational judgement test before.

It’s a great idea to call your prospective employer and ask for information regarding the situational judgement test you are going to complete.

Stretch yourself when practising situational judgement tests

This might seem like a quick win, but it isn’t. It will save you the time needed to work your way through the questions but it won’t improve your situational judgement skills.

Assessing Judgement & Decision-Making using SJT’s

Judgment is one of the most difficult skills to assess online. This is one of the reasons why situational judgement tests have become more and more prevalent in recent years since the first SJTs appeared on the market about fifty years ago. The two other main reasons are that situational judgment assessments offer a fairer assessment than aptitude tests and personality questionnaires. A well-written SJT that is bespoke to a particular job role or managerial level will reflect the judgment and decision-making skills that are required.

SJTs in Practice

  • Situational judgement tests (SJTs) provide a reliable method for measuring important non-academic attributes (such as empathy, integrity and teamwork) that are important for education, training and practice in medicine and a wide range of healthcare roles.
  • SJTs are a measurement methodology rather than a single test per se. As such, SJTs can differ markedly from each other (in scenario content and response formats, for example), and should be designed in collaboration with subject matter experts (SMEs) to ensure their relevance, appropriateness and fairness regarding the target role.
  • When designed appropriately, compared to other selection tools, SJTs are generally reliable, valid, fair and well received by candidates.
  • Although good quality SJTs are difficult to design, once developed, SJTs are a cost-effective and an efficient selection tool for non-academic attributes as they can be computer-delivered and machine-marked.

Situational Strengths Test

There is a specialised form of situational judgement test called the Situational Strengths Test. An excellent example is CAPP’s Situational Strengths Test. This builds on the many advantages that SJTs have, being:

–Easy to administer to large audience

–Relatively strong validity

–Can assess sample of the relevant KSA’s

–Refreshed items possible

–More difficult to fake responses

Bespoke VBR Example

  • 3-4 scenarios will assess each value, giving approx. 15-16 questions
  • Provides accurate and meaningful feedback to each respondent
  • This practical job preview has the advantage of using the same SJT format

Situational interview(s) comprising:

  • Values,
  • Competency and
  • Technical questions

Situational Simulation Exercises

  • Scenarios from job analysis used to design simulation exercises
  • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity and minimise risk of applicants sharing details of tools and compromising the validity of the assessment process

Situational Values-Based Interview

  • We propose a structured interview comprising values, competency and technical pharmacy questions
  • Collaborate with job incumbents to design technical questions / scoring guide.

Passing Situational Judgement Tests

A situational judgment test, or SJT, presents realistic scenarios similar to those that would be encountered when doing a particular job. Typically, candidates must identify the Best and the Worst course of action from four multiple-choice options. In other words, you must make two “judgments” about what to do and what not to do next in the “situation” presented. An alternative SJT format asks the test-taker to rank multiple choice options in terms of effectiveness.

Commonly featured as a graduate recruitment sift, along with numerical reasoning and verbal reasoning tests, the SJT has several advantages:

  • SJTs are a highly effective means of measuring an applicant’s competency behaviours.
  • SJTs are a fair test with little bias due to gender or ethnic group.
  • SJT questions can be designed around a specific role.
  • Because SJTs are bespoke, candidates usually rate them highly as a valid application stage. In fact, there is a type of SJT called a realistic job preview which is used solely to give job applicants a realistic preview of a role.

Situational judgement test tips

If you have a job description or a detailed job advert this will probably tell you some, or all, of the role’s competency behaviours. These are the abilities and skills you need to demonstrate when completing the SJT.

One of our key situational judgement test tips is that these typically measure problem solving skills, team working, leadership/managerial abilities and, if applicable, customer service skills. Employers are looking for someone who has the underlying characteristics and behaviours that will enable them to operate effectively in the given job role.

Passing situational judgment test sifts

  • Each SJT scenario will measure one of these competencies based on both the Best and Worst answers, so focus on getting bothcorrect. You won’t need to get every question right, however scoring low on any given competency will detract from your overall SJT score.
  • Other useful situational judgement test tips include the fact that each SJT scenario requires you to make an effective judgment. This will involve prioritising which aspects of the scenario are most important to fix first. Identifying and addressing this vital element of each scenario is the key to passing a situational judgment test. Any answer option that does not move the scenario situation forward will not be the correct “Best” action to take. The “Worst” answer option will be one that makes the situation even worse.
  • While several answer options may seem like a sufficient solution in the short-term, you shouldn’t be looking for a quick and easy stop-gap solution. The “Best” solution will always be the one that actually solves the problem. You need to identify a medium- to long-term solution that has lasting benefits.

Why use Situational Judgement Tests?

Candidates prefer SJTs compared to cognitive ability and personality tests.

Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone.

There are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole.

What are Situational Judgement Tests?

Firstly, situational judgement tests (SJTs) assess individuals’ reactions to a number of hypothetical role- relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. Such role-analysis based scenarios are developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance.

Secondly, in our opinion, SJTs measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs) – shaped by socialisation processes. For example, helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense).

Are situational judgment tests valid?

SJTs have significant added value (incremental validity) over and above other selection methods such as knowledge tests, measures of cognitive ability, personality tests and application forms. SJTs have lower adverse impact compared to other selection methods, such as cognitive ability tests.

Specifically, evidence consistently shows that SJTs used in medical selection have good reliability, and predict performance across a range of medical professions, including performance in general practice, in early years (foundation training as a junior doctor) and for medical school admissions.

SJTs have the benefit of being appropriate both for use in selection where candidates are novices (i.e. have no prior role experience or knowledge such as in medical school admissions) as well as settings where candidates have substantial job knowledge and specific experience (as in postgraduate recruitment for more senior roles). An SJT specification (e.g. scenario content, response instructions and format) may differ depending on the level of job knowledge required.

Further situational judgement test resources

Firstly, Bledlow’s situational judgment test of personal initiative and its relationship to performance.

  • A sample test of the SJTs we design for clients.
  • Our free practice situational judgement tests.
  • Additional situational judgment test tips are available in Rob Williams Assessment Ltd’s latest Career Builder articles e.g.
  • What you need to know about situational judgement tests

Situational Judgement Test Research 2019

Employers are increasingly using bespoke situational judgement tests (where the candidate is presented with scenarios and asked to select the best and the worst thing to do next) as a way to learn more about their character and attitudes to work.

Situation judgment test trends in 2019

Graduate recruitment trends in 2019

The increase in the number of graduate courses and the career benefits of having a degree have driven a huge increase in the number of graduates. There remains a limited number of vacancies each year on graduate trainee schemes. During the recent years of recession, the number of graduate entry roles became even more restricted; making graduate recruitment even more competitive. Microsoft, for example, received 15,000 job applications for each of its 150 graduate position in 2009. That year, the success ratio of applications to job offers was 1:100 at Microsoft.

This has created a “bottleneck” between the high number of recent graduates and the considerably lower number who are successfully placed on graduate entry schemes. Clearly, there are severe implications of such a challenging job market for graduates. For employers too, there is a “war on talent” to find and sign-up the best possible graduates in the marketplace. It is a recruiters’ market, however most recruiters want to recruit the top echelon of high-performing graduates who are showing the best leadership potential, the most effective ability to work in teams, the highest levels of motivation and drive etc. SJTs offer an effective means of measuring each of these abilities and attributes.


Situational judgment tests in the news

On BBC Radio 2, in February 2014, Dr Almuth McDowell referred to the benefits of situational judgement tests and one of the SJT example items developed by Rob Williams Assessment Ltd.

The same interview on SJT benefits also featured in The Times on 4th Feb, Dr Almuth McDowell, a lecturer at the University of Surrey, says psychometric testing has an important role to play, but only in conjunction with other measures, not least because it is possible to cheat. 

Additional situational judgment test tips are available in Rob Williams Assessment Ltd’s latest Career Builder article entitled “How to succeed at management interview tests”.

Example of situational judgement tests 

You mention in passing to a colleague that you believe there are some financial risks associated with a financial product that’s about to be launched to customers. In a team meeting later that week, your colleague shares this information with your manager – without mentioning your name. How do you react?

You are then asked to select your most preferred and least preferred responses

(a) Apologise on your colleague’s behalf for their poor explanation.

(b) Suggest that your colleague does their own research.

(c) Ask your colleague to also include you in future.

(d) Check that your manager understands the risk involved.

By using real life scenarios, the idea is that employers will get a better understanding of how you might operate in the work place.

Branching situational judgement tests 

As psychometric tests have become more commonplace, the bigger users have commissioned their own bespoke situational judgement tests. Rob Williams Assessment has worked on several such projects for High Street banks and for the European Union. Another recent innovation of test developers has been online adaptive tests. With these tests, if you are doing well, you will find that the questions get progressively harder. That can feel like a challenge since you are pushed until you reach the most challenging level you can. This is the level at which you – just like other candidates with your level of verbal reasoning – start to get questions wrong.

The innovative design of shorter and more efficient tests was driven by an increasingly aware of the immediacy of the Internet and our increasing use of emails and social media in short, sharp bursts.  This discourages test takers from spending 30-40 minutes online doing the same questionnaire. Its better for everyone to keep test takers engaged when being tested – not bored!

Branching situational judgement tests 

So what will adaptive tests mean for you as a prospective test taker?  The biggest difference is the shortness of the test. The second major difference is that you will find an adaptive test more challenging. Without getting into their highly technical make-up, the test adapts to your ability level. More specifically it adapts to find the most challenging question that you can answer correctly.

In the past you may have found questions on a test fluctuating in difficulty or generally becoming more and more difficult the further on you get in the test. Consider a test of twenty questions with the first the easiest and the twentieth the most difficult.

Knowledge-based situational judgement tests 

Some or all of the scenarios presented in an SJT can test specific job knowledge. For example, a retail marketing SJT may ask questions about the 3Ps (price, position, promotion) of product marketing. Alternatively both an SJT measuring generic decision-making skills may be used alongside a knowledge-based test.

Video based Situational judgment tests in 2018

Simulated situational judgement tests are increasingly common as recruitment sifts. Adding 2D or 3D workplace scenario graphics brings the situational judgment test scenarios to life. This can only promote the company brand and make employers using simulated situational judgment tests more desirable employers.

UK and US psychometric test publishers have produced both video-based and animated SJT scenarios. Animated SJTs are easier – and therefore cheaper – for global companies to develop.

Situational Strengths Test

There is a specialised form of situational judgement test called the Situational Strengths Test. An excellent example of CAPP’s Situational Strengths Test can be found here. One company that uses this test is Lloyds pharmacy, where the CAPP Situational Strengths Test is used to recruit pharmacists.

SJTs have these advantages (in any context):

–Easy to administer to large audience

–Relatively strong validity

–Can assess sample of the relevant KSA’s

–Refreshed items possible

–More difficult to fake responses

Situational Fit

SJTs are used as an early stage in a recruitment process.

i) Test sift. 
A sift-out of those candidates that are unfit to progress to the next recruitment stage. Based on their poor fit and/or understanding of the job role to which they’ve applied. For example, when selecting middle managers and specialist managerial positions.

ii) Feature of graduate recruitment processes. 

The SJT scenarios have been crafted to select those graduates that are most suited to a specialist graduate career path, such as finance, logistics, IT etc. In other words, having shown by passing the psychometric ability tests, the graduate applicant then has to demonstrate their suitability to a particular type of graduate career path.

Situational values assessments

1-Bespoke situational values test

A bespoke situational values example would include:

  • 3-4 scenarios will assess each value, giving approx. 15-16 questions
  • Provides accurate and meaningful feedback to each respondent
  • This practical job preview has the advantage of using the same SJT format

2-Values-Based Interview(s)

Structured values-based interview(s) comprising:

  • Values,
  • Competency and
  • Technical questions

3-Situational assessment exercises

  • Scenarios from job analysis used to design simulation exercises
  • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity and minimise risk of applicants sharing details of tools and compromising the validity of the assessment process

Situational judgement test research 2010 – 2019

Firstly, Becker’s development and validation of a situational judgment test of employee integrity.

Secondly, Bergman’s scoring situational judgment tests: Once you get the data, your troubles begin.

Next, Bledlow’s situational judgment test of personal initiative and its relationship to performance.

Also, Campion’s state of research on situational judgment tests: A content analysis and directions for future research.

Then, Catano, V. M., Brochu, A. & Lamerson, C. D. (2012). Assessing the reliability of situational judgment tests used in high_stakes situations. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 20(3), 333–346.

Also, Chan’s situational judgment and job performance.

Next, Guenole’s Are situational judgment tests precise enough for feedback in leadership development?

Situational judgement test research 2010 – 2019 Part II

Also, Houston’s development of the enlisted computer adaptive personality scales.

Plus, Krumm’s how “situational” is judgment in situational judgment tests?

Also, McDaniel;s towards an understanding of situational judgment item validity and group differences.

Then, McDaniel’s situational judgment tests.

And finally, Mumford’s development and validation of a team role knowledge situational judgment test.

SJT research 2008 – 2019 Part III

Next, Peus’ situation-based measurement of the full range of leadership model. Development and validation of a situational judgment test.

Also, Putting judging situations into situational judgment tests: Evidence from intercultural multimedia situational judgement tests.

Finally, Sharma’s development and validation of a situational judgment test of emotional intelligence.

Secondly, Campion’s state of research on situational judgment tests: A content analysis and directions for future research.

Thirdly, Catano’s assessing the reliability of situational judgment tests used in high stakes situations.

Fourthly, Guenole’s are situational judgment tests precise enough for feedback in leadership development?

Fifthly, Krumm’s how “situational” is judgment in situational judgment tests?

Situational judgement test research 2008 – 2019 Part IV

Firstly, Lievens’ situational judgment tests: From measures of situational judgment to measures of general domain knowledge.

Secondly, McDaniel’s Toward an understanding of situational judgment item validity and group differences.

Thirdly, Mumford’s team role test. The development and validation of a team role knowledge situational judgment test.

Fourthly, Peus’ situation-based measurement of the full range of leadership model. The development and validation of a situational judgment test.

Then, next is Sharma’s development and validation of a situational judgment test of emotional intelligence.

And next is Rockstuhl’s putting judging situations into situational judgment tests: Evidence from intercultural multimedia situational judgment tests.

Plus, Weekley’s low-fidelity simulations.

Then finally, Westring’s estimating trait and situational variance in a situational judgment test.

SJT research 2008 – 2019 Part VI

Firstly, Allen, V., Rahman, N., Weissman, A., MacCann, C., Lewis, C., & Roberts, R. D. (2015). The Situational Test of Emotional Management–Brief (STEM-B): Development and validation using item response theory and latent class analysis. Personality and Individual Differences, 81, 195- 200.

Secondly, Ekman, P. (1992). An argument for basic emotions. Cognition & emotion6(3-4), 169-200.

Thirdly, Bledow, R., & Frese, M. (2009). A situational judgment test of personal initiative and its

relationship to performance. Personnel Psychology62(2), 229-258.

Fourthly, Carver, C. S., Scheier, M. F., & Weintraub, J. K. (1989). Assessing coping strategies: a

theoretically based approach. Journal of personality and social psychology56(2), 267-283.

And next Chan, D., & Schmitt, N. (2017). Situational judgment tests. The Blackwell handbook of personnel selection.

Then finally, Ambady, N. (2003). When familiarity breeds accuracy: Cultural exposure and

facial emotion recognition. Journal of personality and social psychology85(2), 276-290.

Situational judgement test research 2008 – 2019 Part V

Firstly, Elfenbein, H. A., Der Foo, M., White, J., Tan, H. H., & Aik, V. C. (2007). Reading your

counterpart: The benefit of emotion recognition accuracy for effectiveness in negotiation. J

Secondly, Farh, C. I., Seo, M. G., & Tesluk, P. E. (2012). Emotional intelligence, teamwork effectiveness,

and job performance: The moderating role of job context. Journal of Applied Psychology.

Thirdly, Heggestad, E. D., & Morrison, M. J. (2008). An inductive exploration of the social effectiveness construct space. Journal of personality.

Fourthly, Hogan, R., Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Kaiser, R. B. (2013). Employability and career success:

Bridging the gap between theory and reality. Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

And then, Kaplan, S., Cortina, J., Ruark, G., LaPort, K., & Nicolaides, V. (2014). The role of organizational leaders in employee emotion management: A theoretical model. The Leadership Quarterly25(3), 563-580.

Motowidlo, S. J., Dunnette, M. D., & Carter, G. W. (1990). An alternative selection procedure: The low-fidelity simulation. Journal of Applied Psychology75(6), 640-647.

Ng, T. W., Eby, L. T., Sorensen, K. L., & Feldman, D. C. (2005). Predictors of objective and subjective career success: A meta‐ analysis. Personnel psychology58(2), 367-408.

Then finally, Schlegel, K., & Scherer, K. R. (2016). Introducing a short version of the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test (GERT-S): Psychometric properties and construct validation. Behavior research methods, 48(4), 1383-1392.

SJT research 2008 – 2019 Part VI

Situational judgement test research 2008 – 2019 Part VIII