Category Archives: Aptitude test design

In this aptitude test design Category, you can firstly find all of our most useful and up-to-date aptitude test information.

Secondly, you can find all of the tips and practice on our site.

We hope you find both of these useful.

Rob Williams Assessment Ltd specialise in designing highly predictive psychometric solutions. In particular, situational judgement test design, realistic job preview design, aptitude test design and personality questionnaire design.

We work across a wide range of sectors and job roles. Our tailor-made psychometric offerings are as unique as our clients’ organisations.

Our organisation prides itself on client satisfaction. We have many positive LinkedIn reviews from our big client projects.

Blog written on white desk with laptop & coffee.

Psychometric design Blog

Welcome to our psychometric design blog. On our psychometric design blog page, we present you with various articles and test practice. We also provide tips and other great advice relevant to almost any assessment.

Psychometric Design Blog

Job specific psychometric test practice

CEB SHL Verbal and Numerical Reasoning Test Practice

Aptitude test practice books

Rob Williams’s five practice aptitude tests books are all available on Amazon:

Firstly, in our opinion, Brilliant Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

Secondly, in our opinion, Brilliant Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests.

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Types of intelligence woman with backpack and books thinking

Intelligence Types

Welcome to our Intelligence Types test. This is only meant as a quick educational tool to indicate that you may have unknown intelligence strengths.

A Quick Indicator of Your Intelligence Types

What would your favourite superpower be? A skill that you would like to just have a lot of. Imagine you could learn anything you wanted to, really quickly.

Well, maybe you can. If you know your learning style and your own potential.

There is a lot of talk about intelligence and assessing ability, Surely you should first define intelligence if you want to start measuring everyone by the same mark. There have been many theories, but not so many definitions of intelligence.

However, most definitions have now come down to the fact, intelligence has to do with the ability to adapt to change. This definition opens up the question of the different theories on it.

Intelligence Types 

A few of the prominent ones include

  • Spearman’s theory – Two-factor theory of intelligence. A generalised intelligence (g-factor) & specialised forms of intelligence (s-factor).
  • Sternberg’s theory – Triarchic theory of intelligence. Referring to the ability to Assess, Create or have ‘Street Smarts’.
  • Gardner’s theory – Theory of Multiple Intelligence. For more on this and learning styles, have a look at this on Effective Learning Styles.

A Quick Indicator of Your Intelligence Types

Welcome to our Intelligence Strengths Test.

This test also assesses the following seven intelligence strengths:

  1. Self-Growth / Self-Growth Intelligence
  2. Emotional / Emotional Intelligence
  3. Logical Reasoning / Logical Intelligence
  4. Kinesthetic / Kinesthetic Intelligence
  5. Spatial Reasoning / Spatial Reasoning Intelligence
  6. Numerical Reasoning / Numerical Reasoning Intelligence
  7. Verbal Reasoning / Verbal Reasoning Intelligence

Intelligence Types 

You can take the Intelligence Strengths Test here.

Intelligence Strengths Test Feedback

Here is the link for completing your Intelligence Strengths Test.

Are your answers mainly (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) or (g)?      You will find that you have several Intelligence Strengths. Here is a quick summary of what characterizes mainly (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) or (g).

Intelligence Strengths Test

Mainly (a)’s – Self-Growth Aptitude / Self-Growth Intelligence

Highly independent, these people are also very independent in their thinking and actions. For example, many entrepreneurs have the strength of Self-Growth intelligence. Typically prefer to solve their own problems – valuing as they do, spending time to think on their own. Acutely aware of their own strengths and weaknesses, such people have plenty of self-motivation to achieve their personal goals and enjoy using challenges for self- development.

Intelligence Types 

Mainly (b)’s – Emotional Aptitude / Emotional Intelligence

Individuals with an emotional aptitude understand what makes other people “tick” and appreciate others’ emotions, motivations and attitudes. Excellent listeners and strong communicators, such emotionally intelligent individuals enjoy spending time with other people. Excellent networkers, such people like to be around others as much as possible in order to talk and to share thoughts/feelings.

Mainly (c)’s – Logical Reasoning Aptitude / Logical Intelligence

Logically intelligent individuals prefer to think things through logically, going through the information step by step in the correct order.

Intelligence Strengths Test

Mainly (d)’s – Kinesthetic Aptitude / Kinesthetic Intelligence

Typically, those individuals with a kinesthetic aptitude have excellent control of their limbs and body. They often, therefore, enjoy sporting activities and being outdoors generally – anything active that requires their superior control of movement. They, therefore, prefer to be physically involved in tasks – to get stuck in.

Mainly (e)’s – Spatial Reasoning Aptitude / Spatial Reasoning Intelligence

People with spatial reasoning intelligence are good at visualizing issues in their heads – as well as understanding maps and diagrams. Their preference is to visualize the inter-connecting components of problems in their head.

Intelligence Types

Mainly (f)’s – Numerical Reasoning Aptitude / Numerical Reasoning Intelligence

Valuing numbers and numerical reasoning, those people with a numerical reasoning aptitude like to manipulate numbers and are quicker at doing mental arithmetic in their heads. For example, accountants and bankers often like working with numbers because of the structure and the order found in data and financial records.

Mainly (g)’s – Verbal Reasoning Aptitude / Verbal Reasoning Intelligence

Being gifted with verbal intelligence is shown through spoken and written communication. Such fluent speakers also enjoy reading the work of others and indulging in wordplay/word games.

Learning to Read

Reading is such a fundamental starting block for any learning. It is the main channel for learning in most schools or educational settings and a necessity for future academic achievement in mainstream education.

Children are however not always ready for the world of reading by the time they go to school. The reason for this is as important as the solution. Some of these reasons or causes for why they may not be susceptible to the world of reading are exactly what you need to identify in order to find the best solutions.

A younger sibling might feel intimidated by the reading ability of the older. Best solutions would include reading separately with the younger sibling to build their confidence.

Advice about Learning to Read

  • A child may not be developmentally ready for reading. Ways to help with this is to
    • Make sure your child knows their sounds. This can be tricky as English is not a phonetical language. Find games, whether on screen or paper to help them learn the rules. Teach Your Monster To Read has been a favourite for us.
    • Start off with pictures, discussing the story told by these and developing a curiosity for the story and expressing themselves in language.
    • Follow your child’s reading with your finger to give them a point to focus on.
    • Find stories that interest them. Whether they are into dinosaurs or princesses. Topics that interest them is the key.

Always remember not to put pressure on your child to start reading. We all do things in our own time, but a negative feeling towards reading can last a lifetime. Instead, focus on creating a love for reading by reading them stories from a young age. When they are ready they will want to carry on finding the stories they love. Children will more readily follow what you do, so also make sure to show them that you make time to read your own books.

Our Other Popular Personality Surveys

You might also enjoy the following:

Firstly, How stressed is your child?

Secondly, How effective is your decision-making style?

Thirdly, How are your Basic Tutoring Skills?

And, How Effective Are Your Time Management Skills?

Plus, Do your Tutoring Skills Need a Tune-Up?

Finally, How well-developed are your English writing skills.

Intelligence Types 

SHL practice tests. Coloured pages of book for practice.

SHL Practice Tests

Situational judgement test practice for SHL

Graduates taking Barclays’ SHL psychometric tests

1.SJT SHL practice test one

  1. Situational Judgement Test Two practice
  2. Inductive Reasoning Test practice
  3. Verbal Reasoning Test practice
  4. Numerical Reasoning Test practice
  5. Situational Judgement Test One practice
  6. Inductive Reasoning Test practice

Barclays has its own unique selection process. CEB’s personality and CEB’s aptitude tests are used. In addition, ‘Barclays Insight Test’. This is a mixture of situational judgement questions and ability questions.

Continue reading SHL Practice Tests

Critical Reasoning Skills

Watson Glaser Test

Law firms rely on critical thinking tests to select the best employees. Watson Glaser ts one such useful critical thinking tests. Individuals who perform well in this test have excellent logical, analytical, and comprehension skills. Such skills are particularly crucial for lawyers. as this career requires critical reasoning. Since its introduction in 1925, the Watson Glaser test has undergone several tevisions and updates to improve its efficiency in assessing critical thinking abilities (The Lawyer, n.d). Notably, employers all over the globe use this test when hiring. The newer vision of the Watson Glaser test takes 40 minutes, whereas the older test requires 55 minutes.

The critical thinking abilities tested in a Watson Glaser test include the areas of deduction, interpretation, inference, evaluation of arguments, and recognition of assumptions (The Lawyer, n.d).

Critical thinking skills test – LNAT

LNAT refers to an assessment that universities use to place students in appropriate undergraduate law courses based.on their assessment scores. The test assesses the capacity, of an individual in particular skills needed to study law; therefore. knowledge of law does not form part of this test, The content of the test is managed by LNAT Consortium members and the test is usually administered by Pearson VUE. LNAT is useful for universities as it assists in making the right choices when selecting individuals from a pool of highly qualified applicants to join their

Legal training institutions apply LNAT alongside other recognized admission guidelines like academic qualifications.

– – – Critical thinking skills – – –

The LNAT test comprises multiple-choice questions (section A) and an essay (section B). The former is computer based and has comprehension passages to check the candidate’s ability to understand. The computer checks scores of an individual and then determines marks out of 42, usually called the LNAT score (LNAT, n.d), The second section requires each candidate to write an essay based on one of three provided subjects. Scores here show the ability of a person to make a convincing argument about the topic and then reach a suitable conclusion. Consequently, the score determines which undergraduate program is suitable for each respective candidate.

How to Find a Specialized LNAT Tutor Online

Hiring expert tutor to aid preparations for the LNAT test can significantly contribute to good scores. Several tutors usually advertise on online platforms to reach potential students. However, some individuals posing as tutors are not experts in LNAT and may mislead candidates. Therefore, applicants should know methods of identifying specialized tutors. It is essential to conduct background checks on a tutor before seeking his or her services. A potential tutor should have adequate experience in LNAT tests. Exceptional understanding of LNAT tests enables a tutor to give students helpful knowledge. Such individuals should be result oriented as students seek their services to obtain good grades. Referral by comrades can connect an individual with a specialized tutor, Therefore, a candidate may inquire from other students receiving similar tutoring services and learn about their experience.

Law School admissions depend on LNAT test scores

Many highly qualified candidates apply for admission to various law programs in law schools. Therefore, LNAT tests provide suitable solution to this problem as it ensures that law schools choose individuals for various programs depending on abilities displayed by their LNAT scores.

– – – Critical thinking skills – – –

Pearson VUE usually provides the LNAT scores to universities on 20th October. Admission tutors of each university then use these scores as part of candidates’ application, Along with other admission criteria, universities use the LNAT test marks to select suitable students (LNAT, n.d). Therefore, universities can utilize LNAT in the best way that satisfies their admission requirements or policies. Notably, LNAT is not a replacement to A levels but used together with other criteria including formal qualifications, performance at interview, the information provided on the UCAS, and personal statement.

Majority of law firms such as Allen & Overy, Clifford Chance, and Hill Dickinson utilize Watson Glaser test when hiring legal professionals. It enables such firms to select individuals capable of critical reasoning that is.vital in legal careers.(The Lawyer, n.d). Potential lawyers should possess the ability to identify problems, apply logic to inference, and make a meaningful conclusion based on evidence, all of which are assessed using the Watson Glaser (Bouygues, 2019).

Critical Thinking Skills for Students

Critical thinking skills are essential in university studies, For instancewa student can use these skills to constructively question information, arguments, and ideas during his or her studies (Bouygues, 2019). Notably, students with such skills are likely to excel in their studies as university education is not all about accepting all information an individual reads or hears.

As such, critical thinking enables students to not only understand the work of others but also to ask the right questions regarding what they have read (Bouygues, 2019). Moreover, writing should demonstrate the ability of an individual to compare arguments of others and the use of evidence obtained in forming opinions, ideas, theories, and evidence (University of Leeds, n.d). Therefore, the practice of learning with an open mind that critical thinking enhances is essential in university studies,

Critical thinking model is essential for enabling students to develop an analytical and systematic approach to studies. The model encompasses the use of common questions like “What if. “How,” “Why,” and “What” during the process of analyzing, describing, and evaluating a text/issue/topic (University of Leeds, n.d). For instance, the description phase helps learners to gain a general understanding of a text, analysis sheds light on its main ideas and conclusions, and evaluation shows ils success and failures.

– – – Critical thinking skills – – –

Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Critical reading skills are useful in determining ways of studying different sources depending on intended inputs in an assignment. For instance, skimming is adequate in getting general information,scanning is appropriate when one wants to grasp cere concepts, and in- depth examination of a source is necessary for understanding its relevance (University of Leeds, n.d). Selection of sources and their useful parts is an essential skill in critical reading. Therefore, choosing reliable and current sources is the first step toward preparing good academic work.

Students should evaluate sources to determine the right ones for academic study. Critical thinking becomes handy when selecting high-quality information that is appropriate for the intended purpose (University of Leeds, n.d), Por instance, knowing the objectives of 4 material and evidence it provides can determine its relevance. Subsequently, applying strategies mentioned above ensures critical writing. For example, using the right sources is likely to produce critical and analytical work required by most university assignments.

Aptitude test practice books

Rob Williams’s five practice aptitude tests books are all available on Amazon.

Firstly, in our opinion this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

Secondly, in our opinion this is the best aptitude test practice book forPassing Numerical Reasoning Tests.

Our Skills Resources

Critical thinking skills

Numerical reasoning and verbal tests

Free online test practice

 Free online numerical reasoning test practicefree online verbal reasoning test practice

Passing numerical reasoning tests

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

Passing verbal reasoning tests 

Verbal reasoning assessments come in many different types of format.

The traditional comprehension format is to have a short passage followed by a series of questions – asking about facts, opinions, and conclusions – based on its content, a bit like those English tests in primary school where you answered questions on a novel extract.

Regardless of the type of test, it’s vital to carefully read each question. Often questions hinge on one or two key words, so you must take more care to interpret these accurately. If questioned whether something “always” applies whilst the passage states that it is “sometimes” the case, then this is a false interpretation.

Scan the passage initially and then read it in more detail. It’s easier to answer each question if you can recall roughly where to find the answer in the text.

Passing abstract reasoning tests

These ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”.

The easier questions typically appear at the start of the assessment and will involve one change in colour, position, size etc .of the figures shown.

Questions become more difficult as you progress and must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. Once you’ve worked out at least one of the feature changes, check through the answer options to discount those that do not conform.

Passing personality tests

When it comes to answering psychometric surveys that evaluate personality, the best advice is to give your “first response”.

Visualise how you would behave at work on a typical good day. Don’t second guess what is being looked for since “faking” and lying are easily picked up.

Practice, practice, practice psychometric tests

Like anything, practice makes perfect. And don’t be afraid to ask the employer which publisher’s tests they use – most will be happy to tell you.

Being familiar with the format, as well as the kinds of questions asked, will give you a clear advantage. On the day, keep calm and remember that most assessments are timed, so answer the questions as swiftly as you can.

Being familiar with the format, as well as the kinds of questions asked, will give you a clear advantage. On the day, keep calm and remember that most assessments are timed, so answer the questions as swiftly as you can.

Popular Personality Surveys

You might also enjoy the following:

Firstly, How stressed is your child?

Secondly, How effective is your decision-making style?

Thirdly, How are your Basic Tutoring Skills?

Also, IntelligenceTypes.

And, How Effective Are Your Time Management Skills?

Plus, Do your Tutoring Skills Need a Tune-Up?

Finally, How well-developed are your English writing skills.

GCSE past papers and 13+ papers. Children writing exam.

13+ Past papers

The focus of this page is 13+ past papers / GCSE Past Papers.

13+ Past Papers 2018

There are 14 Plus exam papers for the following GCSE exams practice:

  • English GCSE past papers practice
  • Maths GCSE past papers practice
  • Science GCSE past papers practice
  • History GCSE past papers practice
  • French GCSE past papers practice
  • Spanish GCSE past papers practice
  • Latin GCSE past papers practice

Additional paid for GCSE practice.

GCSE Past Papers

English GCSE Papers

IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1 Insert)
English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1)
English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2 Insert).
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2 Mark Scheme)
English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3 Insert)
English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3)
English (CIE 2015 Paper 1 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Paper 2 Mark Scheme)
English (CIE 2015 Paper 3 Mark Scheme)

GCSE – English GCSE Papers Part II

IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 1 Insert).
English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 1)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 2 Insert)
English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 2)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 3 Insert)
English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 3)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 11 Insert)
English (CIE June 2015 Paper 11 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 11)
English (CIE June 2015 Paper 21 Insert).
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 21 Mark Scheme)
English (CIE June 2015 Paper 21)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 31 Insert)
English (CIE June 2015 Paper 31 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 31)
English (AQA 2010 Foundation Tier 3712:F)

GCSE Papers – Maths GCSE Papers

IGCSE Maths (Foundation Nov 2010 Paper 1).
Maths (Foundation Nov 2010 Paper 2)
IGCSE Maths (Higher Nov 2010 Paper 3)
Maths (Higher Nov 2010 Paper 4)

GCSE past papers. 13+ Exam room with teacher

13+ past papers

12-13+ English (Colfe’s School 2008-9)
13 + English (Charterhouse 2004)
13+ English (City of London Freemen’s School)
13 + English (City of London Freemen’s School 2012)
13+ English (Dulwich College Specimen Paper A)
13 + English (Dulwich College Specimen Paper B).
13+ English (Dulwich College Specimen Paper C)
13 + English (Dulwich College 2009)
13+ English (Emanuel School)
13 + English Section A (King’s College School Wimbledon Pre-test 2019)
13+ English Section B (King’s College School Wimbledon Pre-test 2019)
13 +English Section C (King’s College School Wimbledon 2017 and Pre-test 2019)

Past papers part II

13English (Shrewsbury 2014)
13+ English (St Edward’s 2016)
13 + English (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016)
13+ English (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13 + English (St Edward’s 2014)
13+ English (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013-14)
13 + English (St Edward’s 2013)
13+ English (St Edward’s 2012-13)
13 + English (St Edward’s 2011-12)
13+ English (St Edward’s 2010).

13Maths (Bromsgrove School 2011)
13+ Maths (Charterhouse 2004)
13 + Maths (Charterhouse)
13+ Maths – Revised (City of London Freemen’s School 2014)
13 + Maths (City of London Freemen’s School 2014)
13+ Maths (Colfe’s School)
13 + Maths (Dulwich College Specimen Paper A)
13+ Maths (Dulwich College Specimen Paper B)
13 + Maths (Dulwich College Specimen Paper C)
13+ Maths (Dulwich College).
13 + Maths (Dulwich College) (2).
13+ Maths (Emanuel School)
13 + Maths (Hampton Court House)

Past papers part III

13+Maths Section A (King’s College School Wimbledon Pre-test 2019)
13 + Maths Section B (King’s College School Wimbledon Pre-test 2019)
13+ Maths (Oundle School 1 2009).
13 + Maths (Oundle School 1 2010)
13+ Maths (Oundle School 2 2008)
13 + Maths (Oundle School 2 2009)
13+ Maths (Oundle School 2A 2010)
13 + Maths (Oundle School 2A 2011)
13+ Maths (Reigate Grammar School 2010)

13+Maths (Shrewsbury 2014)
13+ Maths (Shrewsbury Sept 2013)
13Maths (St Edward’s 2016)
13+ Maths (St Edward’s Scholarsh.ip Paper 1 2016)
13 +Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 2 2016)
13Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 1 2015)
13 +Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 2 2015)
13Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 1 2014)
13 + Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 2 2014)
13+ Maths (St Edward’s 2013-14)
13Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 1 2013)
13+ Maths (St Edward’s Scholarship Paper 2 2013)

Past papers part IV

13 + Maths (St Edward’s 2011)
13+ Maths (St Edward’s 2010).

13Maths (The Perse Upper School 1)
13+ Maths (The Perse Upper School 2)
13 + Maths (The Perse Upper School 3)
13+ Maths (The Perse Upper School 4)
13 + Biology Mark Scheme (ISEB Level 2 2017)

13+French (Alleyn’s School).
13 + French – Listening Comprehension (Dulwich College)
13+ French – Reading & Writing (Dulwich College)
13 + French – Writing (Emanuel)
13+ French – Reading (Emanuel)
13 + French (Kent College)
13+ French (Shrewsbury 2014)
13 + French (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016).
13+ French (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13 + French (St Edward’s 2014)
13+ French (St Edward’s 2013)

13Geography (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016)
13+ Geography (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13 + Geography (St Edward’s 2013)

13+Greek (St Edward’s 2013)

GCSE papers. 13 +. Exam room with children and teacher.

Past papers part V

13History (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016).
13+ History (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13 + History (St Edward’s Scholarship 2014)
13+ History (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013)
13 + History (St George’s College Scholarship)

13+Latin (Dulwich College)
13 + Latin (Emanuel)
13+ Latin (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016)
13+Latin (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13+ Latin (St Edward’s Scholarship 2014)
13 + Latin (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013)

13+Religious Studies (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016).
13 + Religious Studies (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13+ Religious Studies (St Edward’s Scholarship 2014)
13 + Religious Studies (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013)

Past papers part VI

13+Science (Charterhouse 1994).
13 + Science (City of London Freemen’s School)
13+ Science (City of London Freemen’s School 2014)
13 + Science (Dulwich College)
13+ Science (Emanuel School)
13 + Science (St Edward’s Scholarship 2016)
13+ Science (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13 + Science (St Edward’s 2016)
13+ Science (St Edward’s 2014)
13 + Science (St Edward’s 2013)
13+ Science (St Edward’s 2013-14).
13 + Science (St Edward’s 2013)
13+Science (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013)
13 + Science  (St Edward’s Scholarship 2011)

13+Spanish – Writing (Emanuel)
13 +Spanish (St Edward’s Scholarship 2015)
13+ Spanish (St Edward’s Scholarship 2014)
13 + Spanish (St Edward’s Scholarship 2013).

Past papers

13-14+ English (Shrewsbury 2013)

13- 14+ English as an Additional Language (St Edward’s 2016)

French (Shrewsbury 2013)

14+ English (City of London Freemen’s School)
14+English (City of London Freemen’s School 2012).

14+ Maths (City of London Freemen’s School December 2012)
14+Maths (City of London Freemen’s School 2012)

14+ Maths, English & French (Monmouth School)

14+Science (City of London Freemen’s School)
14+ Science (City of London Freemen’s School 2014)

Past Papers

IGCSE English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1 Mark Scheme)
IGCSE English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 1)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2 Insert)
IGCSE English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2 Mark Scheme).
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 2)
IGCSE English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3 Mark Scheme)
IGCSE English (CIE 2019 Specimen Paper 3)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Paper 1 Mark Scheme)
IGCSE English (CIE 2015 Paper 2 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Paper 3 Mark Scheme)
IGCSE English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 1 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 1).
IGCSE English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 2 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 2)
IGCSE English (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 3 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE 2015 Specimen Paper 3)
IGCSE English (CIE June 2015 Paper 11 Insert)

Past Papers Part II

IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 11 Mark Scheme).
IGCSE English (CIE June 2015 Paper 11)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 21 Insert).
IGCSE English (CIE June 2015 Paper 21 Mark Scheme)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 21)
IGCSE English (CIE June 2015 Paper 31 Insert)
IGCSEEnglish (CIE June 2015 Paper 31 Mark Scheme)
IGCSE English (CIE June 2015 Paper 31)
GCSEEnglish (AQA 2010 Foundation Tier 3712:F).

GCSE Maths Practice test set 1A – Paper 1F (Pearson)
GCSEMaths Practice test set 1A – Paper 2F (Pearson)
GCSE Maths Practice test set 1A – Paper 3F (Pearson)
IGCSEMaths (Foundation Nov 2010 Paper 1)
IGCSE Maths (Foundation Nov 2010 Paper 2)
IGCSEMaths (Higher Nov 2010 Paper 3)
IGCSE Maths (Higher Nov 2010 Paper 4).

Which School Guides

Welcome to our Which School Guides:

Firstly, private Sixth Form Admissionstop private sixth Forms Guide , private London Sixth Forms blog and London Sixth Forms Guide.

Secondly, London Prep Schools GuidePrep schools, London prep schools guide and Top London Prep schools blog.

Thirdly, London private schoolsPrivate London School Admissions (A-M), Sunday Times Private Schools League Table and top private girls schools in London.

Plus, London Independent Schools Guide, and London’s top independent school A-Level results.

Then, Grammar Schools GuideLondon 11 plus practice tests11Plus GL Guide.

Grammars using 11 plus GL Assessment Guide , Guide to Grammar School Entry.

Also, UK Boarding Schools Guide, and primary school league tables.

Finally, London Pre-Schools Guide.

Verbal Reasoning Test Practice Tips. Child sitting on books.

Test Tips

Welcome to our psychometric test tips.

Our Top psychometric test tips

  • Make a mental note of words and phrases that indicate a cause and effect. For example, you may be asked to interpret statements with ’cause and effect’ words. For example, since, because, therefore, so, thus, due to, and as a result.
  • Words such as possibly, perhaps or maybe imply that there is a possibility of something happening. Be wary of treating conjecture or speculation as a definite outcome. For example, certain would mean one thing in a question. If coupled in the passage with the word almost, then the meaning is quite different.
  • The best way to prepare for a verbal reasoning test is to do practise questions that closely mirror the actual test you’ll be taking. But there are also many everyday ways you can improve your verbal reasoning skills. For example reading a wide range of challenging books, newspapers and magazines.

Verbal Reasoning test tips

Key words

Watch out for certain keywords and phrases in either the passage or question (or both!). These keywords often act as the link between different pieces of information. In many cases they qualify the information that has been given. When you come across keywords in passages and questions you need to focus on their precise meanings.

Contrast words verbal reasoning test tips 

Spain has always been a popular tourist destination, however it now faces competition from cheaper resorts in other countries.

You need to pay careful attention to the information that follows the contrast word. This is often the key to answering the question.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: Spain is unrivalled as a tourist destination. The answer is False. The sentence says that Spain has always been popular, Then goes on to say that it now faces competition.

Propositions tips example: 

The author claims that his book will improve your verbal reasoning test performance.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: This book will improve your verbal reasoning test performance. Yes, there is a very good chance that this book will improve your performance if used properly. However, this is not a fact so the answer has to be Cannot tell.

Comparisons tips example: 

There is less unemployment in the UK today than at any other point in the past decade.

So, it follows that unemployment rates are lower than they were five years ago.

Absolutes and generalisations tips example: 

UK Most educators agree that excessive television viewing usually damages a child’s concentration.

If faced with the statement: Excessive television always damages a child’s concentration you might be tempted to answer True. The answer is, in fact, False – because the word usually tells you that this is a high possibility, not a guaranteed effect.

So, to summarise: don’t assume that usually means the same as always. In the world of verbal reasoning tests, such words are miles apart!

Verbal Reasoning Test Practice Tips. Executive members of a team discussing strategy.

Cause and effect

After doing lots of practise tests you will come to recognise cause and effect words and phrases. These include: since, because, for, so, consequently, as a result, thus, therefore, due to and hence. It is a good idea to focus on these as often a question will ask you to interpret how these words have been used to link different aspects of an issue or argument together. There are subtle differences between these words and phrases, as some signal stronger causal relationships than others. A word like because indicates a direct causal link. The word so also joins facts together but does not necessarily mean that it was the first fact that led to the second.

More verbal reasoning test tips

  • Firstly, the introductory statement. What points are made?
  • Secondly, the main body of the text. What does this explore/detail?
  • Thirdly, the final statement(s). What details are provided here?
  • Fourthly, the final summary at the end of the passage, what point, if any, is it making?

Finally, ask yourself again. Do I have a sufficient understanding to answer the set of questions? If the answer is yes, then you are ready to carefully read the first question. You may only need to read the passage in full twice if you already know where to find the relevant information. Remember that the passage will always be there for reference. So you don’t need to memorise it.

Don’t worry if the subject matter in the passage is unfamiliar to you. Many of the passages you read will be about areas in which you have no interest or background knowledge. Nor do you need to apply any outside knowledge of the subject.

A reading comprehension task requires you to extract the relevant information to answer each question. Each question will relate to a particular part, or parts, of the passage.

Verbal Reasoning tips examples

1) As a result of oversubscription, Adam did not get a place on the philosophy course.

2) The philosophy course was oversubscribed so Adam enrolled in a different class.

What is the answer if you are asked: Did Adam get a place on the philosophy course? In the first sentence, you know that he did not. The second sentence is more ambiguous. Perhaps Adam got a place, but opted out of the overcrowded course.

Be careful not to mix up causal words with words such as then, next, after and later. These words indicate a chronological sequence rather than a causal effect. For example, then does not imply that one thing caused another to happen, only that it happened after.

Verbal Reasoning tip – Speculation

Look out for words or phrases indicating speculation, such as perhaps, probably, possibly and maybe. Words such as may, might and can also point to the possibility of something happening. You need to tread carefully with such phrases – they do not mean the suggested outcome is guaranteed, only that it is a possibility.

If you are told – The team is almost certain to win the championship – you should not interpret this as meaning that the team will definitely win. It is just speculation, even if there are good reasons for making that prediction.

Verbal Reasoning tips example

Conglomerate Plc announced redundancies in its accounts team, as well as job losses in its logistics and human resources departments.

You may be asked to say whether the following statement is True or False: Conglomerate Plc made redundancies in three parts of its business. The answer would be True because the statement mentions job losses in accounts, logistics and human resources.

‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test Design

Specific design criteria were applied.  Sufficient administration time was made available for a test taker to exhibit the appropriate reasoning ability. 

Other design criteria related to the target population groups. For example, this form of verbal reasoning test does not require the candidate to have any technical knowledge of grammar. Or to be able to spot minor errors in the spelling of unfamiliar words.

Practical examples are proved at the start of each test. Thus, test takers can familiarise themselves with the test format.

VERBAL REASONING TEST DESIGN RATIONALE

Many jobs involve working with verbal information and verbal comprehension forms a core component of almost all senior managerial roles.  The ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test measures the verbal reasoning skills that are fundamental to effective communication in such roles. 

In many organisations, verbal reasoning skills are key to the effective dissemination of business information across the workforce.

‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test assesses how well an individual’s verbal reasoning skills can operate at a high-level.  In our opinion, primarily understanding written communication. Although, ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test also encompasses the ability to understand complex discussions.

Verbal reasoning is central to many roles. Thus the ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test is appropriate for a very wide range of senior job roles and tasks.

VERBAL REASONING TEST FORMAT

Many graduate and senior managerial roles require quickly extracting relevant information from written documents. And to make a judgement based on this information.  Thus ‘Bespoke’ Verbal Reasoning Test measures the ability to read. And to interpret a detailed block of text under strictly timed conditions.

The verbal information in the test appears in the form of passages of text. Each is followed by a series of 4 multiple-choice questions.  Each question requires relevant pieces of information to be extracted from the passage.And a specific judgement to be made on the basis of that information. 

Verbal Reasoning TEST DESIGN

After reading a passage the test taker has to read a series of statements referring back to information contained within the passage.  The test taker has to identify whether the statement is true. Or false. Or whether it is not possible to tell. Then to decide which is the appropriate multiple-choice answer to fill in. 

Each answer must be based solely on the information presented in the passage – ignoring any background knowledge that the test taker may possess.  The questions must also be answered without any interference from the test taker’s own beliefs about the subject matter. 

This reflects work conditions where there is a need to make objective decisions based solely on the information available at that moment in time.

Number of Items:          48

Test Time:         25 minutes

Time needed for Administration (including Test Time):     35 minutes

EXAMPLE APTITUDE ITEM

For each statement, fill in either T, F or CS on the answer sheet.

These corresponds to your decision as to whether the statement is True. False. Or whether it is not possible to tell.

T: True                    

F: False                   

CS: Cannot Say      

Verbal Reasoning Test Prep

Whether you are aware of it or not, you use your verbal reasoning test skills when following a new recipe, reading a notice at a train station, applying for a bank account, or browsing through holiday brochures.

Of course, the best way to improve your performance is always through practice. You’ll get the most benefit if you practise with questions that mirror the exact test you are preparing to take.

There are many skills that you can practise in advance. The test-taker needs to concentrate, pay attention to detail and interpret the meaning of individual words and phrases as well as analysing the overall meaning of a text passage. When answering individual questions the test-taker needs to focus on extracting the relevant verbal information. Imagine yourself as an eagle, circling over the overall passage and then swooping down to zero in on your prey – i.e. the bit of information needed to answer the question correctly.

Verbal Reasoning Test Practice Tips. man in suit at computer, thinking.

Different types of verbal reasoning test

Broadly speaking, the earlier in an assessment process that you are being asked to complete a verbal reasoning test the more important it is to pass. Candidates who do not pass are sifted out of the process, allowing employers to focus on applicants whose skills are most suitable for the job.

Effective verbal reasoning skills are also one of the selection criteria for certain professions

  • medicine’s UKCAT.
  • teaching’s QTS.
  • legal sector’s LNAT.

We offer many practice verbal reasoning tests including LNAT practice test tips.

Verbal reasoning tests allow employers and university admissions officers to assess such skills of a large number of applicants in a standardised way. The same verbal reasoning test is given to a large number of applicants, which increases the fairness of the application process – whilst also making the process more efficient.  A well-designed verbal reasoning test offers both a reliable and a valid means of assessment.

Aptitude Test Practice Strategies

Firstly, skim read the passage to get a rough idea of its content.

Secondly, skim read the questions to get a rough idea of the level of difficulty and the sorts of things that you are going to be asked. Steps 1 and 2 will prepare you for the level of complexity and the time that you need to spend answering the questions.

Thirdly, read the passage again! Go through the passage again but read it more carefully this time. Do not spend time trying to memorise the details. Instead, think in broad terms about the different areas that the passage is covering. Try to make mental notes about where the specific pieces of information relating to each area are located in the passage.

Fourthly, try to get a broad sense of what you are going to be asked in each question and to know where this information was covered within the passage. Ask yourself: Am I in a suitable position to answer the questions? For more complex passages the answer to this will be no. Read the passage a third time. Try to identify the pieces of information in the passage that seem particularly important.

Verbal Reasoning tips example: 

UK Most educators agree that excessive television viewing usually damages a child’s concentration.

If faced with the statement: Excessive television always damages a child’s concentration you might be tempted to answer True. The answer is in fact False – because the word usually tells you that this is a high possibility, not a guaranteed effect.

Cause and effect

You will come to recognise cause and effect words and phrases. These include: since, because, for, so, consequently, as a result, thus, therefore, due to and hence.

There are subtle differences between these words and phrases, as some signal stronger causal relationships than others. A word like because indicates a direct causal link. The word so also joins facts together but does not necessarily mean that it was the first fact that led to the second.

Verbal Reasoning tips example: 

Spain has always been a popular tourist destination, however, it now faces competition from cheaper resorts in other countries.

You need to pay careful attention to the information that follows the contrast word as it is often the key to answering the question.

Is the answer to the following statement True, False, or Cannot tell: Spain is unrivalled as a tourist destination. The answer is False. The sentence says that Spain has always been popular, but goes on to say that it now faces competition.

Who needs good verbal reasoning skills?

As you’ve seen above, everyone needs to have basic verbal reasoning skills to survive daily life. And good verbal reasoning skills are a key prerequisite for many different jobs. Any job that involves frequent communication requires verbal reasoning skills.

At the graduate and managerial levels, many jobs require the interpretation and critical analysis of complex verbal information.

Let’s have a look at a typical office environment and how different workers use verbal reasoning skills to perform their duties.

Why do I need verbal reasoning test practice?

Verbal reasoning ability links to job performance. This is why verbal reasoning tests are so popular for firstly job selection. Secondly, for entrance to certain professions and postgraduate degree courses. Only those where it is essential to work effectively with verbal information.

Many medium-sized and large employers also make extensive use of ability tests. For example, verbal reasoning tests. This is part of their standard recruitment and promotion processes.  Ability tests differentiate high from low performers.

A well-designed verbal reasoning test is a reliable and consistent assessment. It focuses on those verbal skills required for effective work performance.

Ability tests allow employers and university admissions offices to assess a large number of applicants for competitive positions in a standardised way. The same ability test can be given to a large number of applicants. Their results are an efficient means of comparision. This standardisation makes the process much fairer. When compared to old-fashioned, unstructured interviews.

There are many, many different types of verbal reasoning test. These aim at a general level (e.g. graduate tests). Or at a specific career path (e.g. for medical school or law school). There is a corresponding range in difficulty.

Top Ten verbal reasoning test tips

  • Practice has been shown to improve test results. So get in all the practice you can before the big day! Then, it will be easier for you to get into the right mind-set on your actual test day.
  • Ensure that your practice material is as close as possible to your actual test. Find out in advance as much as you can about this verbal reasoning test.
  • Set aside a quiet time when you are unlikely to be disturbed to practice. To do well on the test you’ll need to stay completely focussed. So use high levels of concentration in your practice sessions as well.
  • Pace yourself. Aim for a calm but efficient approach and work systematically, tackling one question at a time. The goal is to complete as many of the questions as possible in the time allowed. If you work too fast, you’ll make unnecessary mistakes. If you go too slow then you won’t complete enough questions.

Top Ten verbal reasoning test tips Part 2

  • If in doubt, double check that you have read the statement correctly. Check that you understood exactly what the question is asking you. Misreading a question can cost you points. Similarly, misreading instructions is a potentially disastrous mistake. So make sure you fully understand the instructions before you begin.
  • Stay positive. If you find yourself struggling with a question, remember that every question is worth exactly the same. Rememebr, it’s just one point. You won’t be expected to get every question right. Or even to complete every question, to pass the test. Aim firstly to do your best. Secondly, to answer as many correctly as possible.
  • You won’t succeed if you guess all your answers. However, if time is running out it makes sense to guess. Putting the same answer option for all your remaining questions may get you a few extra points. So go for it!
  • Learn from your mistakes. You will probably get some of the practice questions wrong. Review the correct answers. Thus you will fully understand where you went wrong and how you need to approach such questions next time around.
  • Check your average time per question when you review your results. Do you need to pick up your pace? Do you need to slow down?
  • Get a good night’s sleep before the test so that you will be fully rested and able to perform to the best of your abilities. Give yourself plenty of time so that you arrive a the testing location with time to spare.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Managerial roles

Most managers will need to use higher levels of verbal reasoning when reading or preparing reports. They need to be able to adapt their spoken and written communication style to the situation, whether addressing their subordinates or customers/ clients. Other company reporting procedures, such as appraisals, also require clearly written documentation.

Senior managers and directors will need to use the highest levels of verbal reasoning skills when analysing company reports, dealing with compliance issues and statutory obligations. Here there is a need for concise and accurate communication.

Verbal reasoning test practice for Customer service roles

Effective oral communication is the key to handling customer queries or sales calls. Talking to customers on the phone or face to face demands a flexible communication style. For example, telesales personnel would be expected to respond differently to a customer who was complaining than to one who was a prospective sale. Persuasive presentation skills also rely upon a solid foundation of verbal reasoning skills.

Verbal reasoning test tips

Verbal reasoning test practice for PA or administrative roles

A PA’s responsibilities typically include written correspondence. For example, letters and emails, which need to use an appropriate tone and level for the intended audience. Administrative roles also need to check written documents. Also, to file these accurately. Plus, to keep on top of plans and procedures that have been agreed orally or in writing.

Verbal reasoning practice tests – Sales roles

Effective oral communication is the key for converting sales call prospects. In particular, sales roles in call centres which require an even more fluent style of communication style.

How to do well on SHL abstract reasoning tests

SHL abstract reasoning tests ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”. The easier questions typically at the start of the test, will involve one change in colour, position, size etc of the figures shown.

Questions become more difficult as you must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. Once you know one of the feature changes, check each answer option to discount any in conflict with it.

You can find more detailed advice in our non-verbal reasoning test article for City Kids online magazine.

Aptitude test practice books

Rob Williams’s five practice aptitude tests books are all available on Amazon.

Firstly, in our opinion this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

Secondly, in our opinion this is the best aptitude test practice book forPassing Numerical Reasoning Tests.

Psychometric test design

We are specialists in psychometric test design. In particular aptitude test design:

  • Verbal reasoning test design.
  • Numerical reasoning test design.
  • Abstract reasoning test design.

Aptitude test design clients include EPSO, Kenexa IBM and HireWindow.

Verbal reasoning test test design is one of our key psychometric test design specialities.

We also specialise in other forms of psychometric test design, such as personality test design and situational judgement test design design.

Numerical Reasoning Test Practice

Why test numerical reasoning?

Many medium-sized and large companies now use Numerical Reasoning Tests as part of their standard recruitment processes. A standardised Numerical Reasoning Test gives everyone the same numerical reasoning questions.

Numerical Reasoning Tests need to accommodate the very wide difference in mathematical ability from school leavers to senior managers.  Correspondingly there is a range of increasingly difficult Numerical Reasoning Tests from the basic Numeracy Tests (which only require mathematical knowledge of the 4 basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) to the most complex and numerical reasoning involved in the interpretation of complex statitistical data.

Introduction

Numerical reasoning ability links to job performance, which is why numerical reasoning tests are now used as part of the selection criteria for certain professions and postgraduate degree courses in which it is essential to work effectively with numerical reasoning information.

Many medium-sized and large employers also make extensive use of ability tests – such as numerical reasoning tests – as part of their standard recruitment and promotion processes. A well-designed numerical reasoning test is a reliable and consistent means of assessing the skills required for effective performance in that working environment.

Ability tests allow employers and university admissions offices to assess a large number of applicants for competitive positions in a standardised way.  This standardisation makes the process much fairer than relying upon old-fashioned, unstructured interviews where every applicant would be asked different questions. Even if you don’t like the idea of being tested on your numerical reasoning skills, at least you know that it is fair since everyone has to do the same test!

Numerical reasoning tests

Everyone uses numerical reasoning skills in daily life – from checking their change in a shop to calculating how long a journey will take. Many different jobs require an ability to work confidently with numbers in order to carry out a range of responsibilities effectively. This could involve anything from interpreting production quotas to carrying out technical work that relies upon detailed calculations.

Whereas an accountant will have demonstrated his or her numerical reasoning abilities in the process of acquiring a professional qualification, other career paths depend on numerical reasoning tests to measure applicants’ skill in this area.

Numerical reasoning test intro – A numerical reasoning test is a type of ability test, sometimes referred to as a psychometric or aptitude test. It is designed to measure specific numerical reasoning abilities relevant for success in a particular course, profession or job. Numerical reasoning tests are an objective and accurate means of assessing a candidate’s potential effectiveness whenever there is a numerical reasoning component to a particular job role or course.

– – – Numerical Reasoning Test Practice – – –

At the more advanced numerical reasoning level, these more advanced numerical reasoning abilities are measured:

  • Interpreting stats.
  • Analysing complex maths in graphs, pie-charts and tables.
  • Using financial data correctly.

Numerical reasoning test for employees

The employers who use these numerical reasoning assessments mainly evaluates how much snug you’re with numbers, basic mathematical functions and analyzing information underneath a substantial time pressure. It is no surprise, that corporation and organizations who take a look at their candidates with numerical reasoning tests typically place confidence in giant numbers and information.

Levels of numerical reasoning skills

These tests are challenging for college students who have a mathematical background, therefore it is no surprise this could be a real problem for students who spent much of their time at the university reading or writing, instead of really tackling with huge numbers and solving various formulas.

Answering the tests

Numerical reasoning tests also come in the form of multiple choice questions. The answers, in contrast to with verbal reasoning tests, are going to be definite. That doesn’t mean it will be easier and this becomes the point of pressure and it is also the reason why the candidates find them so challenging.

Usually, candidates are provided with a variety of questions in accordance with the rule of one question = one minute.

Certain numerical reasoning tests have a repeated pattern and this gives you an idea on how to prepare for it. The common topics that you can prepare for include fractions, ratio and proportion, profit and loss, estimations, percentages, data analysis and graphical interpretation. So, ensure that you practice these portions thoroughly and make yourself comfortable with the different types of questions in these areas.

Numerical reasoning practice test tips

There are always some tips that you can utilize while preparing for your numerical reasoning assessment which are as follows. These tips will easily help you to get through the numerical reasoning assessment easily.

  • Whether you would like to sharpen your number skills or learn everything from the beginning, taking some of the mock tests can help you to improve more. It would not turn you into an excellent mathematician in just one day; however, it will certainly improve your performance to a great extent. It will also prevent you from having too many sleepless nights before the assessment day by rising your accuracy, speed and confidence as well. And you may honestly want a good night’s sleep.
  • Don’t spend too much time on one question. Get a rough calculation of what proportion of time you have got per question before you begin every check and try maintaining those timings. If it feels that it is getting tough, keep going anyway, keeping in mind the fact that the best and easiest questions are yet to come.

More Test Tips

  • While you are practising for the test, try doing it in the same way in which you’ll be sitting your real numerical reasoning assessment. Take your seat in a quiet surrounding with as less distraction as possible at a table. This will increase your focus and also make silence less intimidating and let you practice more thoroughly.
  • The numerical reasoning assessment will definitely not kill you but try to figure out the areas that you are getting wrong most of the time and practice those areas thoroughly. Focusing on those problems will help you to improve your overall test.
  • Thus, following these tips can be really helpful during the day of your numerical reasoning assessment. Do not stress. So, the type of job position you are applying for doesn’t matter, as it can be an investment bank, consultancy firm or the position of a manager, it is compulsory for you to take the numerical reasoning test.

Manager roles use

Many managerial roles require an overall confidence in working with numbers. Line managers need to quickly and effectively digest statistics for their functional area or team. Many will need to understand profit and loss figures, as well as needing to manage their own budgets effectively.

Let’s look at a few other jobs that involve more numerical reasoning than you might expect.

Retail sales roles use

Selling isn’t just about slick presentation skills and a flair for customer relations. At the entry level, retail sales jobs require the ability to handle money correctly and to deal with customers’ transactions competently. Mistakes here could be very costly.

Teacher use

To teach maths it makes sense that you would need to be proficient yourself. But many other academic subjects also require dexterity with numbers. For example, all the sciences use mathematical calculations. Music, design, ITC: all of these fields involve an element of numerical reasoning. Even home economics involves working with measurements. Teachers also need numerical reasoning abilities to calculate students’ grades, to understand performance targets, and to comply with school and departmental budgets.

Useful Websites

Firstly, try test publisher websites. Visit the test publisher Website once you know the type of psychometric tests you will be taking. Since most test publisher Websites offer practice questions.

For example, practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM TalentQ and SHL sites. Reputable test publishers will send you some sample questions for you to practice in advance.

Secondly, familiarise yourself with the test format. Read the instruction and introduction sections carefully for each psychometric test you will take. This should ensure you are familiar with the test format.

– – – Numerical Reasoning Test Practice – – –

Third, try to work efficiently without rushing

Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. You may find subsequent questions easier to answer. With the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions. Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

Fourth, stay positive

If you find yourself struggling with a question, remember that every question is worth exactly the same point. You won’t be expected to get every question right, or even to complete every question. To pass the test – just do your best and try to answer as many correctly as possible.

Fifth, learn from your mistakes

You will probably get some of the practice questions wrong. Review the correct answers so that you fully understand where you went wrong. You should learn how to approach such questions next time around.

Our numerical reasoning test book 

Brilliant Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests and Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

Secondly, Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests book by Rob Williams

Free online aptitude test practice

Free online numerical reasoning test practice / free online verbal reasoning test practice.

Quantitative Reasoning Assessment Practice

Although you may not finish the test, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.

  • Firstly, before deciding upon your final answer. You may be able to rule out one or two of the multiple choice questions as incorrect.
  • Secondly, read each question and also review each chart very carefully. Take one chart and its associated questions at a time. Only start looking at the answer options once you have done this.
  • Ensure that you are also aware of the units of measurement that each question is referring to.
  • Each question is worth the same so don’t spend too long on a single question. So, remember that you may find subsequent questions easier to answer. If there is time at the end of the test you can return to any unfinished questions.
  • Work efficiently, but do not rush. You may not finish the test. However, the best strategy is to answer as many questions as you can in the time available.
  • Remember to only use the information that is provided in the charts. Do not use any of your own background knowledge.
  • Lastly, round up any decimal points and any pence.

Passing numerical reasoning tests

There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

Extra psychometric test practice

Verbal reasoning test tips

abstract reasoning test strategies. Abstract shapes.

Abstract reasoning test practice

High quality abstract reasoning test practice can be found on this page.

Abstract Reasoning Test Intro

In short, the correct answer, (A), is because the largest figure in Set A is white. In each of the 6 squares that make up Set A the largest figure is white. Whereas, the largest figure in Set B is always black.

Abstract reasoning test tips

Graduate abstract reasoning test scores provide an indication of learning potential. Abstract reasoning tests indicate an ability to reason logically and to work with new ‘ideas’. In summary, non-verbal reasoning tests assess critical thinking.

Most of these practice test sites also offer their own abstract reasoning test tips and non verbal reasoning tips.

TalentQ abstract reasoning test practice and TalentQ abstract reasoning test example

Abstract Reasoning Step-by-Step Strategies

Series format non-verbal reasoning tips

In a series abstract reasoning question, you are presented with 4 to 5 boxes in a line. The individual boxes contain a series of ever-evolving figures. For example, there may be one black square and four white circles in the first box. The pattern could be an increase in the number of black figures by one for each step in the series. Thus, the pattern in the second box would be two black figures, three black figures in the third box and so on.

Alternatively, the pattern in the second box could shift such that the colour moves along one place in the series. Thus, the single black square would become a white square and the first white circle would become black.

“Complete the pattern” abstract reasoning practice

Similar to the series abstract reasoning format, instead of having a line of 5 boxes the abstract reasoning format could be more elaborate. This “complete the pattern” type of abstract reasoning test in its simplest format is a 2 by 2, or a 3 by 3, set of boxes in which one of the boxes is empty (except for a large question mark). You need to select which of the five answer options completes the 2 by 2 / 3 by 3 box.

It’s key not to panic. Whilst the question may look more complicated than the series row of boxes, you find the answer in the same way. The pattern will be both horizontal and vertical. This actually makes it easier to spot the similarities across and down the boxes. Once you have spotted the abstract similarities you are very close to knowing how the pattern differs going from one box to the next. Yes, exactly the same as in the simple series form of non-verbal reasoning question.

More abstract reasoning test practice

“Complete the pattern” type of non-verbal reasoning reasoning test can also be displayed in 10+ boxes presented in diamond, star or other matrix-type patterns of triangles typically. One triangle will contain a question mark highlighting this is the missing part of the pattern you need to solve. These again are less complicated than appearances suggest.

Remember with the more complicated “Complete the pattern” type of non-verbal reasoning test that reflection is likely to play a role in many question answers.

Odd One Out format abstract reasoning practice

In an Odd One Out non-verbal reasoning test format, you are presented with five abstract figures and you need to determine which figure (answer options a to e) is the most unlike the other abstract figures.

Abstract reasoning test tips

Questions become more difficult as you must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. It can help, once you’ve worked out at least one of the feature changes, to check through the answer options to discount those that do not conform said feature changes.

As always, test practice and your familiarity with the test format help – with these tests you are strongly advised to learn the range of possible feature changes. leading test publishers Kenexa-IBM and TalentQ have excellent sample questions for you to practise any of these test types. Alongside SHL’s practise test pages these three sites cover most of the psychometric tests you are likely to find. You can ask in advance which test publisher’s test you will take.

The key is to always identify those patterns that differentiate Set A from Set B. You can find further UCAT abstract reasoning test practice tips here.

UKCAT type of abstract reasoning practice

Two blocks of 2 by 3 squares, called Set A and Set B. There are then several questions displaying a single box with the question, To which Set does this figure belong, or is it To Neither Set.

How to do well on SHL abstract reasoning tests

SHL abstract reasoning tests ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”. The easier questions typically at the start of the test, will involve one change in colour, position, size etc of the figures shown.

Questions become more difficult as you must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. Once you know one of the feature changes, check each answer option to discount any in conflict with it.

Additional aptitude test practice

Abstract reasoning test practice