Category Archives: psychometric test design

In this Category, you can firstly find all of our most useful and up-to-date psychometric test design information.

Our psychometric test designs

Secondly, you can find all of the test tips and test practice on our site.

We hope that you find all of our psychometric test design resources useful.

Rob Williams Assessment Ltd specialise in designing highly predictive psychometric solutions.

We work across a wide range of sectors and job roles. Our tailor-made psychometric offerings are as unique as our clients’ organisations.

Bespoke psychometric test designs

Our organisation prides itself on client satisfaction. We have many positive LinkedIn reviews from our big client projects.

In this Category Archive, you can find all of the articles on 11 plus verbal reasoning practice and our Verbal Reasoning Test design info.

Also covered here are the downloadable links to ten-minute aptitude test practice and our bespoke aptitude test designs.

Verbal reasoning tests are one of the most common types of aptitude test design, or ability test design, or reasoning test design.

Aptitude tests refer to tests assessing reasoning ability. In education these include:

Firstly, 11 plus verbal reasoning tests.
Secondly, Non-verbal Reasoning tests
Thirdly, 11 plus Maths tests.
And also, Quantitative Reasoning tests.
Plus, Cognitive Ability Tests.
And also, 11 plus Abstract Reasoning tests.
Then finally, Spatial Reasoning tests.

Practice aptitude test design
Aptitude test prep links are the best way to improve your aptitude assessment results. At the end of each short aptitude test quiz you will be provided with you score and the correct answers. If necessary there will also be a method attached.

Our practice aptitude test quizzes include subject matter for

Firstly, the 11 Plus.
Secondly, the CAT4.
Thirdly, SATs.
And finally, GCSEs.

Our top 11 plus vocabulary tips for increasing your 11 plus vocabulary – and other recommended 11 plus vocabulary techniques. Here you can find all of our most useful and up-to-date 11 plus practice and 11 plus tips. We hope that you enjoy our 11 plus preparation services.

Leadership assessment

EI designs

Welcome to our feature on EI assessment design and leadership assessment design.

Our other psychometric test design specialities 

EI assessment design

Emotional intelligence (EQ) is not necessarily something you are born with. It is a skill that can be developed with consistent effort. EQ is one of those skills that can serve you well if you are not face-to-face with someone.

When we speak virtually, we need to pay extra attention to our tone, explaining context, and develop awareness as to how we are coming across. There is a reason why texts and emails sometimes get misconstrued. It’s because context and how we present something is often just as important as what we say.

Developing our EQ is important to understand how our actions and behaviors might affect others. If we learn to understand our emotions better, we are at less risk of emotional hijacking (a physiological response where emotions override reason) and therefore, saying or acting in a counterproductive way. We are also able to better balance social awareness with relationship management.

EI assessment

What are the core proficiencies that employees need to be developing in the hybrid workplace? In the World Economic Forum’s 2020 Future of Jobs Report, the survey authors designate over a dozen key skills which they call the “top skills” employees need for future success in the workplace.

EI assessment – Emotional Intelligence Profile

We work with PSI – the publisher of the Emotional Intelligence Profile.

Their emotional intelligence EI assessment, the EIP3:

Provides a method for both assessing and developing Emotional Intelligence.

Addresses the underlying attitudes that predict how effectively someone can manage their own emotions and behaviour to perform at work.

EI assessment

Such EI assessment allows organisations to:

Improve assessment decisions by gaining insight into an individual’s Emotional Intelligence and their Defensive Habits under pressure.

Help employees understand their strengths and development areas, and how they can manage their emotions and relationships better.

Maximise employee engagement by developing leaders who will build a positive climate which facilitates innovation, agility and well-being.

Establish and maintain a high-performance culture by cascading the application of EI throughout the organisation.

Think about your own most recent day at the office, and try to recall it in some detail. What would hidden observers have been able to learn had they been watching you?

But would these observers really understand your inner work life that day? Of course not. In having those conversations and writing those reports, you were not only dealing with the task at hand.

What is meant by EI assessment?

You experience emotions, maybe mild states of satisfaction or irritation, maybe intense feelings of pride or frustration. And these perceptions and emotions affect your work motivation—with consequences for your performance that day.

Would hidden observers watching you go through the day really understand your inner work life? Of course not.

What is meant by inner work life?

This is what we mean by inner work life:

  • Dynamic interplay among personal perceptions,
  • Emotions, whether sharply defined reactions (such as elation over a particular success or anger over a particular obstacle)
  • Or more general feeling states, like good and bad moods; and 
  • Motivation—your grasp of what needs to be done and your drive to do it at any given moment.

Inner work life…

  • Goes largely unexamined even by the individual experiencing it.
  • Constantly operates, so its effects are inescapable.
  • Has a clear affect on organizational performance.

EI assessment design

We are assessment specialists in both work and education settings. For more insights into meaningful assessments contact Rob Williams Assessment for a comprehensive appraisal.

Virtual assessments

Best virtual assessments design

Any virtual assessments design still needs to ensure that each assessment centre exercise…

  • Evaluates the competencies needed to execute specific business strategies.
  • Predicts when, for example, leaders will be ready to execute those strategies.
  • Facilitates continuous development, and track improvement of abilities in real-time.

Suitable exercises for virtual assessment centres

The reliability of any exercise depends upon many factors:

  • Quality of the competency framework.
  • Use of experienced and well-briefed / well-trained assessors.

Director Assessment Centre Design

Assessment centres have a well-proven track record for recruiting new employees and selecting existing staff for promotion. Research supports their use as one of the most valid and fair processes available to occupational psychologists – if used in accordance with best practice.

An assessment centre involves written exercise, intray exercise, presentation exercise, role play, and / or a group exercise. Group exercises and presentation exercises are particularly popular for graduate assessment centres.

Why use Virtual Assessment Centres for Director jobs?

An assessment allows the candidate to demonstrate abilities in practice. Whereas an interview cannot do this.

We believe it is less appropriate to use a battery of assessment techniques for jobs requiring basic level skills. Rather than enhancing the outcome, this could put potential applicants off.

Role analysis for virtual assessment centres

  • The job title.
  • The main purpose of the job.
  • The main tasks, responsibilities, and operations the job involves.
  • Supervision given and received
  • Work conditions
  • Initial requirements from a candidate.

– – – Virtual assessment design – – –

After reassuring the hiring ratio and time schedule, the next stage is to define the jobs in demand. In role analysis, the smallest unit of analysis is a task. A task is an assigned piece of work that is finished to some standard within some piece of time. The tasks performed by one individual are termed as a position. All identical or similar positions make up a job.

Virtual Assessment Centres – Fairness

Additional methods of assessment can, therefore:

  • Improve the quality and quantity of information on which to base the selection decision
  • Allow candidates to demonstrate how they meet requirements, rather than relying on self-report and performance at interview.

The most effective way of predicting job performance is to use a mix of assessment methods and look at the results in an integrated way to build up a picture of the candidate.

The most complex being a full Assessment Centre using a range of tests and exercises. In our opinion, assessment centres have the best ROI for graduate and for managerial positions.

Tips for Virtual Assessment Centres

Our virtual assessment centre tips – It’s important for graduate applicants to demonstrate they can collaborate across country borders. Online, “virtual” assessment centres provide a realistic job preview of team working in a digital age. Efficient virtual assessment centres are becoming increasingly popular.

MBTI Change Readiness.

Digital Skills Tests

Here we describe digital skills tests. These are used to verify whether a candidate has the skills they say they have, and are proficient enough to do the job.

For example, a design challenge using Photoshop for graphic designer. Or a proof reading test for editors.

Superskills and Microskills

The market uses various terms to describe skills (eg, abilities, skills, competencies, soft skills, work skills, hard skills, etc.). It’s time to sort this out and use a simpler vernacular going forward.

As we see it, skills include two types of skills: superskills and microskills.

Superskills are the “components” that make up the unique “operating system” of a person. These include, but not limited to, problem solving, critical thinking, quantitative thinking, creativity, listening, communication, change agility, perseverance, motivation, willingness to learn, curiosity, coachability, social skills, leadership, risk-tolerance, and working in teams.

Microskills are the “apps” that the person “runs” (or could run) on their unique superskills “operating system.” These are the things a person can do really well (or learn to do), given their unique superskills footprint. Microskills can include graphic design, software development, financial modeling, equity trading, project management, enterprise sales, product development, QA testing, school teaching, journalistic writing, market research, urban planning, etc.

Virtual assessment design

Graduate Video Interview Tips

During the recent years of recession, the number of graduate entry roles became even more restricted; making graduate recruitment even more competitive. Microsoft, for example, received 15,000 job applications for each of its 150 graduate position in 2009. That year, the success ratio of applications to job offers was 1:100 at Microsoft.

This has created a “bottleneck” between the high number of recent graduates and the considerably lower number who are successfully placed on graduate entry schemes. Clearly, there are severe implications of such a challenging job market for graduates.

For employers too, there is a “war on talent” to find and sign-up the best possible graduates in the marketplace. It is a recruiters’ market, however most recruiters want to recruit the top echelon of high-performing graduates who are showing the best leadership potential, the most effective ability to work in teams, the highest levels of motivation and drive etc. SJTs offer an effective means of measuring each of these abilities and attributes.

Game based learning skills

The popularity of video games has drawn researchers’ attention in the exploration of the possibility of using video games to enhance knowledge, skills, and other personal attributes.

The idea of using games for serious purposes other than entertainment is called game-based learning. Advocates of game-based learning argue that well-designed video games represent solid learning principles. A fair amount of research shows that game-based learning is at least as effective as nongame conditions, such as class- room contexts.

In addition, when game-based assessment is designed following a principled design framework such as evidence-centered design or cognitive design system, the assessment is likely to have high validity and reliability.

Digital Skills transformation

Game-based assessment is essentially performance-based assessment. Tasks that require students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills by working through a task. Rather than a simple test of one’s ability to recall or recognize information, or supply self-reported information, performance-based assessment provides students with the opportunity to show their understanding and apply knowledge in meaningful settings.

Our Virtual Work Skills Resources

Scholars generally support the use of performance-based assessment to measure and support twenty-first-century skills over conventional types of assessment such as multiple-choice questions or filling in the blanks.

Virtual Assessment design

Good games can provide an engaging and authentic environment designed to keep practice meaningful and personally relevant. With simulated visualization, authentic problem solving, and instant feedback, computer games can afford a realistic framework for experimentation.

Another key feature of well-designed games that can enhance learning and motivation is adaptivity related to providing appropriate and adaptive levels of challenge. Gee has argued that the secret of a good game is not its D graphics and other bells and whistles, but its underlying architecture in which each level dances around the outer limits of the player’s abilities, seeking at every point to be hard enough to be just doable.

Similarly, psychologists (e.g., Vygotsky) have long argued that the best instruction hovers at the boundary of a student’s competence. Flow is another name for this phenomenon. It is a construct first proposed by Csikszentmihalyi to describe an optimal experiential state that involves complete immersion in an activity and a deep sense of enjoyment. Flow represents full engagement, which is crucial for deep learning.

Digital Skills transformation

The vast number of data points that are now included in traditional, gamified and game-based assessments gives you more information to interpret, so you can make more accurate decisions about your candidates. Also, because the way each of us processes information and responds when we’re assessed is unique, it’s now possible to create a ‘psychometric fingerprint’ for each candidate. Knowing not only what score a candidate achieved but how they went about it can help you to prevent cheating and spot potential.

virtual assessment design

Graduate digital skills transformation

Graduate recruiters who want to minimise recruitment costs see online ability tests as an efficient and effective means of sifting the initial applicant pool. Verbal and numerical reasoning tests offer a reliable and standardised way to ensure that an optimal number of good candidates are seen by the business at the much more expensive ‘face-to-face’ stage. Chances are that this next stage will involve a retest in order to verify that the candidate who took the online test was who they said they were!

Online testing is particularly attractive for the ease with which multinational organisations can offer the same test(s) in a wide range of different languages to graduates around the world. The use of standardised tests in the recruitment process helps to ensure that applicants from different countries and from different ethnic groups are treated fairly.

We believe in the benefits of practice and ensuring fairness in testing. We, therefore, offer some practice aptitude tests and some practice psychometric tests. The intention is to promote as ‘level a playing-field’ as possible.

virtual assessment design

Employability Skills

All of our psychometric test practice resources are free. So, we hope you enjoy using them!   In our opinion, there is plenty of the right type of aptitude test practice, aptitude test tips and test-taking strategies.

We certainly hope you get maximum value from our free psychometric test practice resources!  Psychometric test practise works best when it’s specific to the test type and the level of difficulty of the psychometric test you will be taking.

Virtual Assessment Centre Design

Assessment centres have a well-proven track record for recruiting new employees and selecting existing staff for promotion. Research supports their use as one of the most valid and fair processes available to occupational psychologists – if used in accordance with best practice.

An assessment centre involves written exercise, intray exercise, presentation exercise, role play, and / or a group exercise. Group exercises and presentation exercises are particularly popular for graduate assessment centres.

Why use Virtual Assessment Centres for Director jobs?

An assessment allows the candidate to demonstrate abilities in practice. Whereas an interview cannot do this.

We believe it is less appropriate to use a battery of assessment techniques for jobs requiring basic level skills. Rather than enhancing the outcome, this could put potential applicants off.

Role analysis for virtual assessment centres

  • The job title.
  • The main purpose of the job.
  • The main tasks, responsibilities, and operations the job involves.
  • Supervision given and received
  • Work conditions
  • Initial requirements from a candidate.

Virtual assessment design

After reassuring the hiring ratio and time schedule, the next stage is to define the jobs in demand. In role analysis, the smallest unit of analysis is a task. A task is an assigned piece of work that is finished to some standard within some piece of time. The tasks performed by one individual are termed as a position. All identical or similar positions make up a job.

Virtual Assessment Design Centres – Fairness

Additional methods of assessment can, therefore:

  • Improve the quality and quantity of information on which to base the selection decision
  • Allow candidates to demonstrate how they meet requirements, rather than relying on self-report and performance at interview.

The most effective way of predicting job performance is to use a mix of assessment methods and look at the results in an integrated way to build up a picture of the candidate.

The most complex being a full Assessment Centre using a range of tests and exercises. In our opinion, assessment centres have the best ROI for graduate and for managerial positions.

Tips for Virtual Assessment Centres

Our virtual assessment centre tips – It’s important for graduate applicants to demonstrate they can collaborate across country borders. Online, “virtual” assessment centres provide a realistic job preview of team working in a digital age. Efficient virtual assessment centres are becoming increasingly popular.

virtual assessment design

Big5

Big Five Personality Profiling

  • Extroversion: Introversion, shy, quiet, withdrawn, untalkative, inhibited, VERSUS extroversion, talkative, verbal, sociable, outgoing, dominant, assertive.
  • Agreeableness: Sympathetic, kind, warm, understanding, sincere, considerate, VERSUS self-centred, non-conformist, unsympathetic, unkind, harsh, insincere.
  • Conscientiousness: careful, organised, neat, orderly, systematic, precise, practical, VERSUS risk-taking, experimenting, disorganised, disorderly, careless, absent-minded.
  • Emotional stability: emotionally stable, un-envious, relaxed, optimistic, unemotional, VERSUS anxious, neurotic, nervous, tense, fidgety.
  • Intellect: creative, imaginative, complex, philosophical, intuitive, abstract thinking, open to experience, VERSUS uncreative, un-intellectual, unintelligent, shallow, ignorant, short-sighted, sensual, concrete thinking.

Personality is at the heart of how we deal with the world. As individuals our unique personalities are powerful predictors of the way in which we respond across a broad range of different situations.

In short, personality can be seen as the underlying pattern of thoughts and feelings that influence what we are likely to do. For personality to affect our behaviour in this way, it must also be consistent and stable, although obviously it will be influenced by context and culture.

At a theoretical level psychologists have studied personality for over 100 years. Comparatively recently, over the last 50 years, a consensus has emerged and there is now agreement that the Five Factor Model (FFM) represents the best structure for human personality. Psychologists agree that these five factors capture the most important and basic personality differences between people; or as some researchers describe them, they are the ‘primary colours’ of personality (Trickey & Hogan, 1998).

Openness to Experience:

Playful, curious, imaginative, creative, open- minded, seeks novelty, forward looking/ visionary.

Conscientiousness:

Orderly, committed, confident (sense of mastery), achievement oriented, reliable, self- disciplined.

Extraversion:

Active, energetic, thrill-seeking, enthusiastic, assertive, interactive, friendly.

Agreeableness:

Accommodating, loyal/trusting, compassionate, altruistic, steady, cooperative, forgiving/tolerant.

Emotional Stability: Calm, even-tempered, positive, resilient/robust, deliberate, easy- going, regulated.

Like many concepts in psychology, there are a number of people who can claim to be the fathers of the FFM, but it’s worth mentioning that the original breakthrough came as a result of the re- analysis of work conducted by Raymond Cattell in the late 1940’s (Cattell, 1946; Russell & Karol, 1994). He constructed a personality model based on the analysis of natural language. The idea was that a

‘lexical’ approach would identify an exhaustive list of words used to describe personality, and thus of all the possible personality traits.

Personality And Life

To illustrate the richness of the relationship between personality and a range of human attributes, here are some example findings for each of the Big Five factors:

Openness to Experience

Openness is related to a person’s in-built values system. People who are ‘open to experience’ are tolerant and accepting and see everyone as equally deserving of justice and equality (Douglas, Bore & Munro, 2016).

Conscientiousness

Conscientious people respect orderliness, duty, achievement, and self-discipline, and are concerned with increasing their competence. The factor is also related to conformity and tradition (Roccas, Sagiv, Schwartz & Knafo, 2002).

With respect to the rest of the Big Five, Conscientiousness correlates weakly (and negatively) with Neuroticism, and Agreeableness. It does not appear to be related to the other factors (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Extraversion

Extroverts are often assertive, active and sociable. They can also be hedonistic, and actively seek excitement and pleasure.

with Openness to Experience (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Agreeableness

Those with Agreeable personalities place an emphasis on compassion, generosity and trust. They are less concerned with power, achievement or ego-related activities.

Generally high levels of agreeableness are related to good life adjustment (Soldz & Vaillant, 1999).

Neuroticism

Neuroticism, or the lack of Emotional Stability over time, is negatively related to:

  • Self-esteem, self-efficacy and internal locus of control (Judge, Erez, Bono, & Thoresen, 2002).

The reactive and impulsive aspects of Neuroticism relate positively to:

  • Hedonism (pleasure without responsibility) and negatively to benevolence and conformity (Roccas, Sagiv, Schwartz, & Knafo, 2002).

Long term research has demonstrated that Neuroticism is related:

  • Inability to cease using alcohol or drugs, being unable to adjust to problems
  • Mental health issues (Soldz & Vaillant, 1999.)
  • With regard to the other factors, Neuroticism correlates weakly and negatively with Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. It also has a weak negative relationship with Extraversion and Openness (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Personality And Work

  • Predictive of both job competencies and more specific work behaviours
  • Such as: attendance, worker turnover, management potential, leadership and occupational health.
  • Correlations run from -1.0 (perfect negative) to +1.0 (perfect positive). Not much, especially continuous attributes like human personality, ever gets close to -1.0 or +1.0.

Rob Williams latest book 

Are you chasing a job that you really want, but need to take a verbal reasoning test to get it? With the help of this book, you’ll sharpen your skills and quickly become confident in your ability to pass. 

Brilliant Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests book – also available for download from the Apple Store. 

Leadership assessment

Screening

We cover both bespoke pretesting and bespoke screening tests. Screening tests can help you identify which applicants are a good match for the role and for your company culture.

These are more valid than cv’s which can leave recruiters to fill in the gaps between what’s written and what’s actually relevant. Skills tests during the application stage help filter out applicants who don’t have the skills you need. 

Continue reading Screening
Financial Personality online private tuition tools

Financial Well-Being

There are many forms of well-being: psychological well-being, psychological safety and financial well-being are of particular interest.

financial well-being tips

These six financial well-being tips encourage a slower-paced life. The consequences of which should be being more mindful with your money.

Our top financial well-being tips

1. Learn the basics of money management

You can’t be intentional with your money if you don’t understand the basics. Think of money as

  • a tool to reach your lifestyle goals.
  • you can learn about it.
  • understand it
  • use it to achieve your dreams.
  • BUT don’t let it overwhelm you or control your life.

The more you know, the more confident you’ll be in using your money with clear intent.

2. Stick to your personal values

This means aiming to be:

  • guided by those core beliefs that bring meaning and purpose to your life.
  • For example, having a healthy lifestyle, being helpful in your local community or prioritising your family time.
  • Make a list of your top three priorities and connect them with how you spend your money.

3. Be proactive

This means:

  • looking daily at your bank balance.
  • checking up on your pension.
  • coming up with an action plan to get out of debt.
  • recalibrating your investment portfolio.
  • setting a weekly money date to go over your expenses.

4. Recognise your spending triggers

  • Go through your bank statements for the past three months, and highlight all your unplanned and impulsive expenses.
  • Think back to what you were feeling when you made the decision to buy.

Recognising what drives our triggers helps us take pause the next time we feel the need to spend impulsively.

However, it’s also important to make space in your budget for spontaneous, fun spending, to avoid feeling resentful and deprived.

5. Use savings targets

Saving is hard enough as it is, but it’s harder still when we don’t know what we’re saving for. It’s important to set goals and time frames for your savings.

It also helps to keep them in separate, labelled accounts. Investing for the long-term – your retirement, for example- can feel even harder than saving.

A trick I’ve learned to keep me motivated is to try and establish a connection with my future self: picturing what I’ll be like, the life I’ll want to be living, my financial priorities and lifestyle choices. While it’s important to live in the moment, we shouldn’t neglect our future needs.

5. Prioritise your mental wellbeing

When we’re hurting or fearful, we’re more inclined to make poor financial decisions. Prioritising your mental wellbeing every day, not only on the weekend or holidays, is the cornerstone of good money habits.

Exercise regularly, use breathing techniques, set clear boundaries at work, go to therapy if you need to and connect with yourself in whatever way that works for you. Practising intentional spending is much easier when our headspace allows us to do so.

Our financial wellbeing is just as important as our mental and physical wellbeing. Being able to meet current and ongoing financial obligations and reach our goals helps us feel more secure, enabling us to enjoy our lives that much more.

While our busy lifestyles can feel all-consuming, making the time to practice and appreciate a slower pace of life not only helps us adjust how we spend our money, it also makes it much clearer to see what truly matters to us in the long term

Financial well-being subcategories

  1. Financial Well-Being – Security
  2. Freedom of Choice

Choices and options give you happiness. Not weatch per se.

  1. Present and Future

We dont know what’s around the corner. Which is why people are often advised to invest in bricks and mortar.

Financial Well-Being Strategy

Consider different areas of your life and how to attirbute your money:

  • Living (food, shelter, utilities) – 55 % according to the reliable Rowntree Foundation.
  • Leisure (hobbies, interests and socialising)
  • Learning;
  • Financial Freedom
  • The What If factor

Other key consdierations are managing debt, and giving to charities.

Bloomberg Financial Test

The first thing I noticed was that the international test publisher Hogrefe Group describing the role that personality plays in trading (on the financial stock markets).

The Bloomberg Financial Test  made me interested because it is a measure of “financial aptitude” – not a personality test.

Also, Barclays are doing some interesting personality research in this area. Primarily, individual financial preferences for investing. This personality research is very innovative. I predict that other financial institutions may offer similar personality-based profiling for their investors.

Work meeting

Pandemic impact on personal finances

The coronavirus outbreak has sent a shockwave through the finances of millions of people in the UK.

The effect has not been universal, nor has it been equal. Your age, your job, where you live, and the pre-virus state of your finances will all make a difference to how well you can cope.

For a start, there has been the effect on income. For those who work, the amount of money coming in depends mostly on their wages.

More than nine million people have been off work but paid by the state to stay in their jobs – in other words, placed on furlough.

The government, to date, has paid 80% of someone’s wages. Not every employer can afford to top this up.

Our other personality test blogs

Our personality test tips

Bespoke personality test design

Financial well-being

Jobs in Media Studies. Digital marketing. Woman working on laptop.

Digital skills guide

Welcome to our digital marketing jobs listings.

We also offer a short exploration of the latest digital marketing skills.

       


      Welcome to our exploration of digital marketing skills. Plus, the new era job roles for which these specialist marketing skills are most needed,

      We start with one of the most widely publicised, the professional gamer.

      Continue reading Digital skills guide
      STEM Graduate tests. Graduates studying in library.

      Grad potential

      Welcome to our latest feature on assessing potential – Graduate Potential – following our assessing leadership potential and assessing digital potential articles.

      Combining psychometrics with assessment exercises is a very reliable means of assessing graduate potential. Well-designed recruitment stages can focus specifically on a future-focused company’s key high potential leadership qualities.  

      According to the Harvard Business Review, 40% of businesses incorrectly identify their graduate potential. High potential employees are notoriously difficult to identify without psychometric assessment.

      Bespoke graduate assessment designs

      Designing graduate psychometric tests is our speciality. With a bespoke psychometric test, organisations can design the content of their test(s) to match their own industry sector.

      Verbal reasoning test practice for graduates

      • Customer service roles

      Effective oral communication is the key to handling customer queries or sales calls. Talking to customers on the phone or face to face demands a flexible communication style. For example, telesales personnel would be expected to respond differently to a customer who was complaining than to one who was a prospective sale. Persuasive presentation skills also rely upon a solid foundation of verbal reasoning skills.

      Graduate Verbal reasoning test practice

      • PA or administrative roles

      A PA’s responsibilities typically include written correspondence. For example, letters and emails, which need to use an appropriate tone and level for the intended audience. Administrative roles also need to check written documents. Also, to file these accurately. Plus, to keep on top of plans and procedures that have been agreed orally or in writing.

      Verbal reasoning practice tests for graduates

      • Sales roles

      Effective oral communication is the key to converting sales call prospects. In particular, sales roles in call centres which require an even more fluent style of communication style.

      Graduate assessment design

      At a time when the graduate market is at its most competitive it pays for all graduates to perform their best on these psychometric tests. It makes sense to be prepared. Fortunately, there is a wide variety of practice material available, allowing graduates to familiarize themselves with the sort of tests they’ll encounter as part of the recruitment process.

      Graduate recruiters who want to minimise recruitment costs see online ability tests as an efficient and effective means of sifting the initial applicant pool. Verbal and numerical reasoning tests offer a reliable and standardised way to ensure that an optimal number of good candidates are seen by the business at the much more expensive ‘face-to-face’ stage. Chances are that this next stage will involve a retest in order to verify that the candidate who took the online test was who they said they were!

      Verbal reasoning test practice for Graduate trainees

      Recent graduates who have just started working on a training scheme will apply their verbal reasoning skills whenever they interact or correspond with other members of staff. They need to match their verbal communication to different levels of seniority and adjust their communication style to suit the formality of the meeting or event. Graduates may also need to prepare business reports. These should not read like an essay!

      Managerial Verbal reasoning test practice

      Most managers will need to use higher levels of verbal reasoning when reading or preparing reports. They need to be able to adapt their spoken and written communication style to the situation, whether addressing their subordinates or customers/ clients. Other company reporting procedures, such as appraisals, also require clearly written documentation.

      Senior managers and directors will need to use the highest levels of verbal reasoning skills when analysing company reports, dealing with compliance issues and statutory obligations. Here there is a need for concise and accurate communication.

      Graduate tests

      Bespoke graduate assessment designs

      Infact it is bespoke aptitude designs which are our speciality. Otherwise known as company-specific tests. With a bespoke psychometric test, organisations can design the content of their test(s) to match their own industry sector.

      AN EARLY START TO GRADUATE ASSESSMENT & DEVELOPMENT

      The OPG recognises that developing high potential leadership is resource intensive. Applicants demonstrating the right skills, attitudes and leadership potential need to be singled out early. For their potential, and their current capability, to be developed. And this simply cannot be achieved through interview alone.

      The OPG designs robust, engaging and consistent graduate selection assessments. Serving as a single point of contact for your online psychometric testing requirements. As well as providing consulting expertise and support in recruitment outsourcing.CONTACT US

      BESPOKE GRADUATE ASSESSMENT DESIGN FOR GRADUATE RECRUITMENT

      As well as having access to market-leading psychometric tests, The OPG also design specialist assessments. These include Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) and assessment centre design. Our consultants work with our clients directly. To craft bespoke competency based interviews, case study exercises, presentations and other specialist materials. All with the aim of helping graduate recruiters to gain a better understanding of a candidate’s behaviour, values and competencies.CONTACT US

      SCALABLE

      Our graduate assessment tools are completely scalable to address online psychometric solutions of any magnitude. From low volume and niche assessment centres. To bespoke online recruitment processes aimed at larger scale graduate recruitment campaigns.CONTACT US

      Graduate assessment design

      • Consistency, fairness and objectiveness are the key to effective graduate assessment.
      • Graduate recruiters who want to minimise recruitment costs see online ability tests as an efficient and effective means of sifting the initial applicant pool.
      • Verbal and numerical reasoning tests are the most commonly used online sifts.
      • Passing usually leads to an assessment centre. Here, at that this next stage graduates are often retested. This is to verify that the candidate who took the online test was who they said they were!

      Graduate jobs search

      Online testing is particularly attractive for the ease with which multinational organisations can offer the same test(s) in a wide range of different languages to graduates around the world. The use of standardised tests in the recruitment process helps to ensure that applicants from different countries and from different ethnic groups are treated fairly.

      We believe in the benefits of practice and ensuring fairness in testing. We therefore offer some practice aptitude tests and some practice psychometric tests. The intention is to promote as ‘level a playing-field’ as possible.

      Aptitude test solutions

      Our consultancy work focuses on aptitude test practice and bespoke psychometric test design. We believe in the benefits of practice and ensuring fairness in testing. We therefore offer some practice aptitude tests and some practice psychometric tests. The intention is to promote as ‘level a playing-field’ as possible.

      Graduate tests

      Aptitude test design – Employability

      All of our psychometric test practice resources are free. So, we hope you enjoy using them!   In our opinion, there is plenty of the right type of aptitude test practice, aptitude test tips and test-taking strategies.

      We certainly hope you get maximum value from our free psychometric test practice resources!  Psychometric test practice works best when it’s specific to the test type and the level of difficulty of the psychometric test you will be taking.

      Graduate Assessment designs for aptitude

      Our first point is that a well-designed selection procedure focuses on predicting a graduate’s competency within a particular work context.

      Secondly, that psychometric assessments only form one part of the selection procedure.

      Our third point is that personality assessments can give an indication of how well an individual applicant will fit into the existing workplace or team.

      Finally, psychometric assessments can assess which applicants are most suited to the demands of the vacant job in terms of both ability and personality factors.

      Graduate tests

      Graduate Internships Tips

      Many graduate jobs require work experience. But how do you get experience if you’re straight out of University? One way is to get an internship. In other words a temporary job ‘learning the ropes’ within a chosen profession.

      While sometimes these internships are paid – especially in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) sectors – often they’re not. For example, it is not uncommon for those who want to work in the media to undertake several unpaid internships before getting a paid job.

      First internship written on a notepad.

      Our graduate internships guide

      The Sutton Trust’s survey of graduates revealed more than a quarter (27 per cent) have undertaken unpaid internships. Of those, over two fifths (43 per cent) relied on living with friends or family. A further quarter (26 per cent) get financial support from their parents. And another 27 per cent have a second job to fund their internship.

      Lack of social mobility

      According to the Sutton Trust, the minimum monthly cost of doing an unpaid internship is £1,019 in London. This is when you take into account rent, bills, travel and other living costs. In Manchester, it is a little cheaper (£827), but not much. As a result, it is often graduates from wealthier backgrounds with families who can support them who take unpaid internships.

      Says Sir Peter Lampl, founder of the Sutton Trust and chairman of the Education Endowment Foundation:

      “Unpaid internships prevent young people from low and moderate-income backgrounds from accessing careers in some of the most desirable sectors such as journalism, fashion, the arts and law. It prevents these young people from getting a foot on the ladder.”

      It’s a view which Chris Rea, higher education services manager at student job site Prospects, shares. He recently told People Management that unpaid internships inhibit social mobility and trap graduates in “a cycle of hopelessness that damages their self-esteem”.

      “Unpaid internships are the scourge of the graduate labour market,” he added. “They absolutely must, in all circumstances, be paid.”

      Our graduate internships guide

      Are unpaid internships illegal?

      While under current legislation it is still technically legal for some employers to offer unpaid internships, there are very strict guidelines. (See Rights to the National Minimum Wage below). Furthermore, Conservative Peer Lord Holmes has a private members’ bill going through Parliament which will improve the rights of graduates looking for work experience.

      The Unpaid Work Experience Bill will prevent companies from offering unpaid internships greater than four weeks when it eventually becomes law. It follows research from the Social Mobility Commission in October 2017 which showed that three-quarters of nearly 5,000 adults surveyed in a YouGov poll supported banning lengthy unpaid internships.

      As Lord Holmes writes in an article in Parliament’s Magazine, Politics Home: “One of the most pernicious ways in which the advantages of the fortunate few are entrenched is through the illegal yet widespread practise of unpaid internships.”

      However, the bill hasn’t yet become law. Which means that in the meantime some unscrupulous employers will continue to take advantage of young and often desperate graduates who want to get a foot on the career ladder.

      Our graduate internships guide

      Tips for first Internship – Your Rights to the National Minimum Wage

      So what are your rights as an intern? Under national minimum wage (NMW) legislation, interns must be paid if they count as a worker. This is defined as someone who has a contract (or a promise of a future contract) and has to turn up to work, even if they don’t want to.

      However, there are exceptions. By law, employers do not have to pay interns the national minimum wage if they are doing it as part of a UK-based higher education course. Nor do they have to pay them if they are working for a charity or voluntary organisation and are receiving limited expenses for food and travel. (If interns are paid over and above this then they must receive the national minimum wage).

      Also if the intern is only work-shadowing – ie. observing an employee and not carrying out any work themselves – companies don’t have to pay them either.

      Internship guide. Young people with laptops sitting around a table.

      Our graduate internships guide

      Should I do an unpaid internship?

      There is no doubt that company bosses are now waking up to the fact that lengthy unpaid internships are exploitative. Often this is because they realise that interns are their ambassadors.

      Treat them badly and they will tell people that it’s a terrible place to work. Treat them well and they will sing the company’s praises to their friends and family.

      Nevertheless, a quick search on Google reveals that unpaid internships aren’t going away any time soon. This is especially true in certain areas such as marketing, HR, fashion and journalism. However, should you consider an unpaid internship if needs must?

      Yes, if you think it will help your career or if it’s flexible enough to give you the time you need to study or work elsewhere to make some money. No, if you are handed a contract and expected to work certain set hours doing a job that you should get money for!

      Our graduate internships guide

      Getting a good first internship

      Obviously, the best internships are those that pay you a wage. However, this shouldn’t be the only criteria. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) has produced some best practice guidelines for employers. These are available in its Internships that Work guide.

      It advises companies to recruit interns through an open advert, in the same way as other employees. This is to prevent work experience jobs going to friends and family of the company’s bosses as so often happens. Interns should also have as much responsibility and diversity in their work as possible and have time off to attend job interviews elsewhere.

      Finally, interns should receive a proper induction and an evaluation of their performance during their time within an organisation. Interns should also receive a reference letter when they leave.

      Getting your foot on the career ladder is never easy. But at least with new legislation and more enlightened employers, it is becoming a more level playing field for all graduates, regardless of their background.

      Graduate Jobs

      Graduate startup opportunities

      There are many graduate startup opportunities currently – especially in and around London. No longer do graduate managerial training schemes need to be the first step on a specific career path.

      Here are some of the typical graduate job decisions around graduate startup opportunities:

      Do I work for a startup or a corporate?

      Startup and corporate compant cultures are very different.

      The corporate world brings advantages from stability. But disadvantages fro their being less autonomony and more centralised decision-making.

      Whereas start-ups are more innovative and Most start-ups apply agile working practices Graduates with a more adaptable mindset and who have strong creative thinking skills are more likely to feel comfortable here.

      • What is the typical graduate looking for in the first job?
      • How do graduate job choices reflect their degree subjects?
      • Graduate Job Outcomes

      Graduate Jobs

      Our Graduate Jobs Resources

      Other Graduate Resources

      Contact Us Today

      assessment design. Man at computer

      Assessment Exercise Design

      Here we define the key characteristics of Assessment Centre design and assessment exercise design. 

      • Assessment Centre design
        • Group Exercise design
        • In-tray Exercise design
        • Fact Find Exercise design
        • Role Play design / Interactive Exercise design
      • Competency-based Interviews and Interview Guide Design
      • Development Centre design and development exercise design

      Competency Assessment Design

      An effective competency design framework is crucial to the operation of many HR practices.

      Shown below is an example of a typical competency design framework used in an assessment centre. In this case, the group exercise’s competency component of the overall assessment centre competency matrix:

      – Oral Communication

      How clearly and confidently the individual communicates with the group.

      – Planning and Organising

      – Judgement and Decision-Making

      How logically the individual makes their decisions and judges other participants’ input/comments.

      – Analysis and Problem-Solving

      How effectively the individual analyses the scenario’s issues and the solutions proposed.

      – Finding Solutions

      The number and effectiveness of the ideas generated.

      – Teamworking

      How well the individual works with and encourages the other group exercise participants.

      Assessment Centre Exercise Reliability

      The reliability of any exercise depends upon many factors, in particular the…

      • Quality of the competency framework
      • Use of experienced and well-briefed / well-trained assessors

      Role play design

      Role play design is based on assessing those skills, knowledge and behavioural competencies required for performing the role effectively. You need to know key facts like this as part of your role play preparation.

      Role plays simulate how candidate interaction with a customer, manager or colleague.

      Typically, in a managerial assessment centre or development centre, the candidate will be placed in the simulation’s managerial role for which they are applying, The simulation’s company will similarly parallel the type of company and company sector to which they have applied.

      Simulations typically involve interactions with colleagues, peers and / or senior managers. For more specialist roles the role play design can be even more specific.

      In tray exercise design

      In-trays simulate the (administrative) day-to-day issues someone in the assessed role would face. The candidate must offer solutions for as many items as possible,  a typical in tray will instruct the candidate to prioritise the full set of issues and their associated actions.

      assessment design. Man at computer designing

      In Tray Design – Pros and Cons

      • Tricky to develop
      • Take 2-3 times the time of other assessment exercises to develop
      • Require a mixture of job-relevant items to be supplied by 1-2 job incumbents
      • High face validity with a cross-section of role-specific issued raised
      • Provides some timetable flexibility, since in trays exercises can be scheduled for individual candidates to complete, or with two or more at a time
      • Can assess a range of different job specific competencies, particularly organisational and quality-focused competencies. For example:
      • Problem analysis and solving skills
      • Time management and prioritisation
      • Delegation skills and decisiveness
      • Concern for quality and equality; for customers
      • Responsiveness
      • Leadership style and motivational skills
      • Skill in the officer/Member interface
      • Performance management
      • Technical knowledge
      • Coalition or partnership building skills
      • Written communication
      • Planning and organising
      • Strategic thinking and breadth

      Checklist for Designing the In-tray Exercise

      • Have clear assessment criteria
      • Each item must be based on an existing work related issue.
      • Clear and concise candidate instructions are required. Here are the key points to highlight in the in tray instructions:
        • Candidate’s assumed name for the purpose of the exercise (the addressee on all correspondence);
        • Candidate’s assumed job title (usually the job being applied for);
        • An explanation of the contents of the in tray exercise (as consisting of memoranda, letters, reports, e-mails and other documents).
        • The specific time and date, i.e. the in tray exercise context.
      • Group exercises typically involve a group of four to six candidates given a group or individual exercise briefs.

      Fact Find Exercise Design

      The fact find exercise used in assessment centres for specialist roles is an excellent means of assessing analysis and decision-making skills.

      Fact find exercises aren’t as complicated as they sound. Imagine how a journalist will probe a Government Minister. Here’s how a fact-find exercise works. Imagine a scenario where a journalist asks their interviewee a series of questions. The journalist is investigating the facts behind a story. In a fact-find exercise the candidate must ask a series of questions to establish the facts about a situation.

      Fact Find Exercise Example

      It will be clear that information is missing from this scenario situation. Also, there will be no clear correct or incorrect response. In fact, it is the Resource Person who holds all the information and is willing to provide you with answers… as long as you ask the right questions.

      The task set is usually broken down, with a few minutes allocated to several exercise phases, such as:

      1. Create a list of questions to “fill in the blanks”.
      2. To direct each of your questions in turn at the Resource Person. Whilst they will have background information to the incident scenario they will not be able to advise you of how you should respond.
      3. Review the situation again in the light of this additional information.
      4. To consider how you would respond.
      5. Present your recommendation, along with your reasoning backing-up your decisions.

      Candidate preparation for taking any assessment

      1. Preparation may be seen as the responsibility of the assessment provider as well as the candidate. Assessment guides may be used to alleviate candidate anxiety. Giving advice such as ensuring that they get a good night’s rest.
      2. Candidates who have not encountered verbal assessments before can practice by doing crosswords and other word puzzles. Preparation for a numerical reasoning test could also be done using mathematical puzzles.
      3. All assessment practice can calm nerves and increase confidence it is unlikely to significantly improve the final test scores.

      The best preparation is really to have done similar type tests before. One major issue is the time – learn to do things being highly aware of the time it takes – this really improves test scores.

      CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSESSMENT CENTRE DESIGN

      The typical contents of an assessment centre are

      Matrix based assessment

      Assessment based on set criteria

      Multiple assessment of individuals

      Several assessors are involved

      Information gained is integrated

      Assessment Centre Design – Multi-Method Assessment

      Assessments are based on a variety of different techniques.  These can range from simulation exercises, tests, interviews and self-reports.  This helps to ensure that full coverage is given in measuring the attributes, behaviours and skills and in turn increase the reliability of assessment.     

      Based On Set Criteria

      The centre should always be based on clearly identifiable and measurable criteria or dimensions (Competencies). These characterise the behaviours that lead to successful performance in the workplace.

      Multiple Assessments of Individuals

      Multiple Assessors Involved

      Through the use of multiple assessors, it is possible to ensure that personal bias does not interfere in the assessment of any one individual.  In this way, it helps to increase the objectivity of assessment with each individual being assessed by as many different assessors as possible. 

      Information Is Integrated

      Decisions and recommendations resulting from centres should be based upon a collection of the data gained having been thoroughly discussed and debated in an integration session.

      THE HISTORY OF ASSESSMENT CENTRE DESIGN

      In Germany and Britain, officer selection was based on the qualities required for soldiers in conjunction with tests of intelligence. 

      In 1942 War Office Selection Boards (WOSB) were set up using a mixture of psychiatrists, psychologists and military officers to assess candidates’ performance with regard to criteria set for officers.  These assessments which included group discussions, short lectures, obstacle courses, leaderless group tasks were the precursor of the Assessment Centre as we know it today.

      British Civil Service

      FollBased on the success of the work of the WOSB the Civil Service Selection Board (CSSB) was created.  Validation of the tests proved them to be extremely good predictors of job performance leading to their introduction in parallel with the traditional examination and interview after 1958.

      The AT&T Development Centre

      In 1956 The American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) set up a Management Progress Study.  The study was aimed at identifying those variables, which led to success at AT&T.  Due This allowed the data to be stored away and not used for its usual purpose of selection and promotion.  The study lasted over 25 years and is renowned as one of the validation studies carried out in the area.  Results appeared to indicate a strong link between performance in the Centre and performance in the workplace over a substantial period of time.  The AT&T Company used a designated building to carry out the assessments.

      The Development of Assessment Centre Design

      The 1970’s saw a rapid growth in the use of Assessment/Development Centres in the United States.  Estimates now vary on the extent of usage from figures of 300 to 2000 companies.

      COMPETENCY-BASED ASSESSMENT

      COMPETENCIES – THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF ASSESSMENT

      This section will aim to provide an overview of competencies; how they relate to Assessment Centres and where they come from.

      Competencies are a cluster of behaviours that have been identified as integral to highly effective performance in any given role.  

      ‘…..clusters of behaviour that are specific, observable and verifiable are assessed in assessment centres’

      An effective competency framework is:

      • Observable & Measurable – the behaviours incorporated in the competency framework must be clearly visible and quantifiable.
      • Discrete – there should be no overlap between competencies. 

      Supported by behavioural indicators. Using both positive and negative indicators of performance.

      Business driven

      The framework must be related to the business needs of the organisation in order to promote behaviours that will drive the business forward.

      • Future-proofed 

      Assessment Exercise Design

      assessment design. Candidates at table

      METHODS OF ASSESSMENT CENTRE DESIGN

      To effectively measure the competency framework developed for a role, assessment/development centres employ a wide range of exercises.  Some assessment methods are individual tasks. Others involve the interaction of the candidate/participant with either the assessors or other candidates in the centre.

      Interactive Exercises

      Group Exercises

      • Role exercises with particular roles to play in solving the issue presented to them. 
      • Unassigned exercises use the same brief and they work as a team to solve the particular task/issue presented to them.

      Presentations

      Role Plays

      THE ORCE MODEL

      Assessors must adopt a consistent and systematic approach to the assessment of the exercises.

      • Observation

      • Recording

      • Classification

      • Evaluation

      Assessment Exercise Design

      STAGE ONE- OBSERVATION

      Assessors must stay alert at all times and concentrate on actively observing the candidate/s assigned to you.

      STAGE TWO – RECORDING

      Whilst it is important that you are observing the candidates behaviour in any simulation exercise it is critical that you record everything you see clearly.  It is this record of behaviour which will form the basis of your assessment and enable you to ‘rate’ an individual’s performance on the exercise. 

      It is critical that whilst you are observing and recording information from an exercise you withhold judgement of the behaviour seen.  You must only take notes on what you have observed and attach no value judgements to what have you have seen.  (during the 1 to 1 exercise with the assessor you may observe that the candidate consistently over talked you). To suggest that this upset you as the assessor would be an evaluation of the situation.

      STAGE THREE – CLASSIFICATION

      Having observed and effectively recorded the information presented in an exercise the next task is to classify the information appropriately against the relevant competencies. 

      In a presentation exercise:

      ‘Jill spoke clearly and concisely throughout the presentation and on several occasions checked the understanding of the observer by summarising and restating what had been said.  Her proposal did not appear to have taken consideration of all the relevant factors making several assumptions without checking….’

      STAGE FOUR – EVALUATION

      To distinguish between the information gathered and enable you to make an effective accurate assessment.

      Assessment Exercise Design

      USEFUL ANALOGIES

      The Paint Pot Analogy

      For some competencies, you will see either a presence of behaviour or absence of behaviour.  FIt is helpful to think of an empty paint pot.  The pot represents the amount of opportunity the simulation offers to show creativity.  The amount of paint in the pot represents the amount of behaviour you observed against the opportunities offered.

      The Scales Analogy

      Here evaluation is based on a process of weighing up the positive behaviours versus the negative behaviours to see the balance achieved.

      As with the paint pot model, there is a degree of judgement involved in this approach. 

      THE RATING SCALE

      You should write a summary of the evidence gained for each competency using the summary forms provided and assign a rating to each competency assessed.  There are a range of different types of rating scales.

      PITFALLS TO AVOID

      ·         Just like me: Assessors often fall into the trap of positively rating candidates who are “like” them in a subjective way.  Try to assess the described competencies – not your own subjective criteria.

      assessment design. People around table in meeting

      Assessment Exercise Design

      THE INTEGRATION PROCESS

      INTEGRATION MEETING

      • The purpose of the meeting is to provide an opportunity to share these ratings and the evidence gathered with the other assessors.
      • Before the integration meeting, or ‘wash-up’ you will have observed and rated behaviour independently across a range of exercises.
      • The meeting allows the group of assessors to come to a common, agreed view of the candidate’s performance in the centre.
      • The integration sessions at the comprise each pair of assessors, with the centre manager on hand.

      COMMON ISSUES ARISING FROM AN INTEGRATION MEETING

      •    The assessors who marked the candidate on the same competency in another exercise may also have to read out their ratings and evidence.
      •    You will need to listen to this and discuss any discrepancies you see.  It is important that you listen carefully during this process and question each other with regard to the evidence provided.

      “Assessment Centre Mathematics”

      Remember that these numbers simply reflect behavioural evidence.  It may be that on assessor gives a candidate a rating of 3 for a particular competency whilst another gives them a 4.  Remember that different exercises may provide differing opportunities to display certain behavioural indicators for a competency.  Always ensure that you go back over the evidence in detail to see the extent to which the candidate has managed to cover the competency definition and indicators across the different exercises.

      Conflicting Data & ‘Primary/Secondary’ Evidence:

      Sometimes you may find that different exercises will provide you with completely conflicting evidence.  When this is the case make sure you not only check the extent to which the competency definition has been met but also check which exercise provides the primary source of evidence.   The general rule should follow that when data is conflicting the overall rating should follow that of the primary source of evidence. 

      Assessment Exercise Design

      Rating Not Matching the Evidence

      It is important that assessors are open to discussing and debating the ratings they have given to candidates they have assessed.  Final ratings should be based upon a consensus of agreement among the group of assessors. 

      THE INTEGRATION MATRIX

      The Integration matrix is similar to the assessment matrix but designed for just one candidate/participant. 

      CENTRE MANAGEMENT

      In this section, we look at the practical issues in running your assessment centres.

      Our Assessment Centre Design

      TIMETABLE

      You will need to take account of a number of factors when deciding upon a
      timetable:

      • Availability of assessors and candidates – What time commitments are plausible from these groups of people.
      • Numbers – We recommend that you design centres to run with either 6 or 12 candidates, and assume a candidate: assessor ratio of 2:1.
      • Venue – What rooms are available?  What is the layout of these rooms?  Remember that the assessors will need a ‘bunker’ room for write-ups etc.
      • Exercises – How long are the exercises?  Remember to include administration and scoring time into the timetable.

      Assessment Exercise Design

      MATERIALS FOR THE CENTRE

      The assessor manual should include copies of all the exercises, but can also form the course notes for assessor training.  A manual might include some of the areas covered within this manual.

      In addition, the following materials will need to be made available for the assessment centre:

      • Exercise booklets for candidates and assessors
      • Observation forms, scoring guidelines and summary sheets
      • Any test materials
      • Pens, pencils, erasers, rough paper, calculators and stop watches.
      • Candidate Folders (1 per candidate)
      • Name plates / badges

      ASSESSOR POOL

      The assessor pool should ideally comprise of line managers from a range of functions together with professional assessors.  In addition, some assessors and centre administrators may be HR specialists.

      Assessor training is crucial, and workshops typically last between 1 and 2 days. 

      Assessment Exercise Design

      CANDIDATE BRIEFING

      All candidates need to know what to expect from an assessment centre.  The briefing should be friendly and clear.

      Essentially, the briefing should cover a number of key points:

      • What is an assessment centre?
      • Why are they used?
      • What will happen on the day?
      • Do assessment centres actually work?
      • How can I prepare?
      • What feedback will I receive and what happens to my data?
      assessment design hand writing

      QUALITY ASSURANCE

      The Centre Manager will have received instructions to monitor the quality of the assessor’s work, and will offer assistance and immediate feedback as necessary.

      Time is critical and every minute must be effectively utilised as there is no scope for falling behind in terms of your assessor responsibilities for assessment, rating and summaries in terms of comments.

      Assessment Exercise Design


      Our Practice assessment books 

      Brilliant Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests

      Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests

      Numerical Reasoning book reviews

      The cost of this book is definitely worth the outlay when yoiu have a interview coming up. I really like the examples and thought it was close to real test I took.

      5.0 out of 5 stars. I got the job.

      Our Assessment Exercise Design

      Buy this book to pass!

      Brilliant book. Read it from cover to cover. Don’t skip the chapters. I know it can seem patronising, the way he breaks it down, but I’d recommend reading it through.

      Brilliantly practical and informative

      Very clear layout to follow, questions advance over the …

      Very clear layout to follow, questions advance over the chapters and it sets a steady pace. This book helped me immensely to get all the practice I needed within 3 days.

      A really useful book 


      Our 11 Plus Practice

      Try Test Feedback Now – Ten-Minute Maths Test for 11 Plus and a range of very reasonably priced 10-minute psychometric tests with feedback.

      Our Assessment Exercise Design

      Numerical reasoning and verbal tests

      Free online test practice

       Free online numerical reasoning test practicefree online verbal reasoning test practice

      Passing numerical reasoning tests

      There aren’t any quick wins for being good at maths but some focussed practice will improve your score, as will following a few test-taking strategies.

      As a timed assessment, you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately. Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.

      Numerical reasoning test practice is an excellent means of brushing-up on any maths functions you haven’t used in a while. Ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

      You can practise the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. Practise sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL as these sites cover most of the tests you are likely to find.

      Passing verbal reasoning tests 

      Verbal reasoning assessments come in many different types of format.

      The traditional comprehension format is to have a short passage followed by a series of questions – asking about facts, opinions, and conclusions – based on its content, a bit like those English tests in primary school where you answered questions on a novel extract.

      Regardless of the type of test, it’s vital to carefully read each question. Often questions hinge on one or two key words, so you must take more care to interpret these accurately. If questioned whether something “always” applies whilst the passage states that it is “sometimes” the case, then this is a false interpretation.

      Scan the passage initially and then read it in more detail. It’s easier to answer each question if you can recall roughly where to find the answer in the text.

      Passing abstract reasoning tests

      These ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”.

      The easier questions typically appear at the start of the assessment and will involve one change in colour, position, size etc .of the figures shown.

      Questions become more difficult as you progress and must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. Once you’ve worked out at least one of the feature changes, check through the answer options to discount those that do not conform.

      Passing personality tests

      When it comes to answering psychometric surveys that evaluate personality, the best advice is to give your “first response”.

      Visualise how you would behave at work on a typical good day. Don’t second guess what is being looked for since “faking” and lying are easily picked up.

      Practice, practice, practice psychometric tests

      Like anything, practice makes perfect. And don’t be afraid to ask the employer which publisher’s tests they use – most will be happy to tell you.

      Being familiar with the format, as well as the kinds of questions asked, will give you a clear advantage. On the day, keep calm and remember that most assessments are timed, so answer the questions as swiftly as you can.

      Being familiar with the format, as well as the kinds of questions asked, will give you a clear advantage. On the day, keep calm and remember that most assessments are timed, so answer the questions as swiftly as you can.

      Popular Personality Surveys

      You might also enjoy the following:

      Firstly, How stressed is your child?

      Secondly, How effective is your decision-making style?

      Thirdly, How are your Basic Tutoring Skills?

      Also, IntelligenceTypes.

      And, How Effective Are Your Time Management Skills?

      Plus, Do your Tutoring Skills Need a Tune-Up?

      Finally, How well-developed are your English writing skills.

      MAP test practice

      Culture Fit

      Welcome to our values test design feature, which includes our NHS values fit match and remote workers job search.

      Are you considering working as an NHS doctor, or an NHS nurse? You can get a quick oveview of your values fit using our free NHS values fit match tool.

      Our other psychometric test design specialities 

      Work Values Fit Tests

      We specialise in several types of culture fit and work values fit tests:

      1. Values fit – useful measure for startup selection processes
      2. Personality fit – similar to cultural fit
      3. Team fit
      4. Career fit
      5. Personality work values tests
      6. Fit designs for matching corporate values to personal values
      7. Situational Values Fit Designs

      What is organizational culture?

      Culture should be integrated into every aspect of business strategy, and at the heart of culture lies employees. The frontline between a company and its customers should be people who love their jobs, care about customer satisfaction and promote overall company success. Employees are a brand’s first customers and best advocates, and company culture is the key to keeping them engaged. 

      Create a trusting culture

      • Brands need to generate and sustain a culture of believers and advocates, which comes from building trust.
      • Leadership behaviors can start this process, but it is the mission of strong culture to establish trust among all levels.
      • Employees want their company’s mission to align with their personal values. If they believe in your goals, they will support your success.
      • People work and behave better as a team when they trust that everyone is on the same page. 
      • Building trust is the key to greater employee engagement, which has a direct impact on customer satisfaction.

      Get an emotional commitment from your employees

      • Engaged employees need to feel confident that they belong and are important to the company, so go the extra mile and show them that you care.
      • Take the time to know each individual employee on a more personal level and take a genuine interest in his or her success. 
      • Nurture an emotional commitment with your employees with rewards and recognition beyond pay increases and promotions.
      • Employees want to feel a sense of ownership and that their input can make a genuine impact, so reaffirm their areas of strength and encourage their innovation.
      • When they trust that they have a home to grow within a company, they go the extra mile to excel for themselves, their coworkers and the business as a whole.

      Inspire employee engagement

      • This generates both commitment and connection, intellectually and emotionally.
      • Highly engaged employees are motivated to succeed, to help others and inspire them to do their best. They also become highly persuasive advocates for the brand who help meet company goals faster.
      • Whilst, disengaged employees need you to offer them some sort of plan for re-engagement.
      • Since, employees don’t quit jobs, they quit managers, so start by coaching and training great management.
      • Always ensure to first provide disengaged employees with all the resources, tools and data they need for best practice.
      • Plus, you should also make engagement a key performance indicator to hold managers accountable.

       

      1) Personality work values fit tests

      1. Values fit – useful measure for startup selection processes
      2. Personality fit – similar to cultural fit
      3. Team fit
      4. Career fit
      5. Personality work values tests
      6. Fit designs for matching corporate values to personal values
      7. Situational Values Fit Designs

      Rob Williams Assessment Ltd has experience of designing personality values tests that are generic in nature.

      2) Matching corporate values to personal values

      Alternatively, specific values test which assesses a company’s values. Hence, an individual’s fit between their personal values and their work’s organisational values. Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are often used to measure values. Also, the fit with a company’s values.

      •  3-4 scenarios to assess each value.
      • Totalling approx. 15-16 questions.
      • Provides accurate and meaningful feedback to each respondent.

      3) Values based situational judgement tests 

      Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

      At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

      Work Values – Interview

      A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

      Work Values – Simulation Exercises

      • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
      • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
      • Minimise the risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
      • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

      Work Values Fit Tests

      3) Situational judgement tests – values

      Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

      At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

      Values-Based Interview

      A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

      Values-Based Simulation Exercises

      • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
      • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
      • Minimise risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
      • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

      Work Values Fit Tests

       

      What are your personal values? Here are some questions to prompt exploration of your personal values:

      • 1 – When you need inspiration what do you do?
      • 2 – Which goals are you most proud of in your life to date?
      • 3 – What do you think about during your spare time?
      • 4 – Which subjects do you read about in your spare time?
      • 5 – In which activities do you lose your sense of time?
      • 6 – In which areas do you have the strongest reputation?
      • 7 – What to you choose to buy with your disposable income?
      • 8 – Which tasks come much easier to you than to other people?
      • 9 – What are your main activities in your spare time?

      Universal Values model (Schwatz)

      • Hedonism value
      • Tradition value
      • Achievement value
      • Universalism value
      • Benevolence value
      • Self-Direction value
      • Security value
      • Conformity value
      • Power value
      • Stimulation value

      Benevolence: honest, kind, forgiving, responsible.

      Universalism: equality, wisdom, beauty, environmentalist.

      Self-Direction: creative thinking, independence, choosing own goals, intellectually curious.

      Security: Safety, family focus, friendship / belonging.

      Conformity: Restraint of impulses, self-discipline, being polite, respecting others.

      Hedonism: Enjoying life’s pleasures.

      Achievement: Ambition, capabilities, success, influence.

      Tradition: Respect, commitment.

      Stimulation: Novelty, challenges, variety, daring.

      Psychometric Test Design. People having colour fight.

      SPECIALISMS

      Rob Williams Assessment Ltd specialises in custom psychometric test design services for SME’s and scale-ups. Plus we’ve helped SHL and Kenexa IBM with larger EU, BA and CItibank psychometric design projects; designed video assessments (HireVue); and been commissioned by leading psychometric consultancies, such as SOVA and CAPP.

      Psychometric test design specialists

      Contact us Today

      Our Bespoke Psychometric Designs

      Many of the UK’s and US’s leading test publishers have used Rob Williams Assessment’s to calculate and prove the reliability of their Personality Test designs and Situational Judgement test designs.In addition to situational judgement test design, we also specialise in Assessment designs, Aptitude test designs and Job preview designs.

      What is our definition of

      Workplace diversity?

      Diversity needs a very wide definition to cover all the possible personality traits, attitudes and values which Rob WilliamsAssesment Ltd measure in our bespoke psychometric tests.

      Workplace inclusion?

      • Inclusion is ‘making the mix work’ by
        • Valuing people as individuals.
        • Respecting their differences.
        • Applying that individual knowledge and skillset.
        • Having an open and trusting working environment
      This is what unlocks diversity’s power.

      Workplace equality?

      • Ensuring that no single employee is given favorable treatment because of who they are.
      • Do all members of staff have qual access to what’s needed for effective work performance, career opportunities and rewards.

      What are the risks of making the wrong recruitment decision? Costs

      • Time
      • Effort
      • Recruiting costs
      • Business results

      Risks

      • Reputation
      • Customer service quality of care

      Benefits

      • Positive experience for customers and staff
      • Efficiency
      • Quality

      Our Bespoke Psychometric Design Principles

      For training consultancies, Rob Williams Assessment Ltd has built coaching and employability profiling tools.With recruitment agencies we’ve designed culture and role fit personality-based assessments to improve the efficiency of matching clients to the best-fitting jobs.

      Our psychometric test design solutions

      • Our consultancy work focuses on aptitude test practice and bespoke psychometric test design.
      • We believe in the benefits of practice and ensuring fairness in testing. We, therefore, offer some practice aptitude tests and some practice psychometric tests. The intention is to promote as ‘level a playing-field’ as possible.

      Psychometric Test Design. Man at desk working at laptop, picture taken from the top

      Our SJT designs

      As psychometric tests have become more commonplace, the bigger users have commissioned their own bespoke situational judgement tests.Rob Williams Assessment has worked on several such projects for High Street banks and for the European Union. Another recent innovation of test developers has been online adaptive tests. With these tests, if you are doing well, you will find that the questions get progressively harder.The innovative design of shorter and more efficient tests was driven by an increasingly aware of the immediacy of the Internet and our increasing use of emails and social media, in short, sharp bursts.This discourages test takers from spending 30-40 minutes online doing the same questionnaire. It’s better for everyone to keep test takers engaged when being tested – not bored!

      Knowledge-based situational judgement test design

      Some or all of the scenarios presented in an SJT can test specific job knowledge. For example, a retail marketing SJT may ask questions about the 3Ps (price, position, promotion) of product marketing. Alternatively, both an SJT measuring generic decision-making skills may be used alongside a knowledge-based test.

      Our video-based situational judgment test designs

      Simulated situational judgement tests are increasingly common as recruitment sifts. Adding 2D or 3D workplace scenario graphics brings the situational judgment test scenarios to life. This can only promote the company brand and make employers using simulated situational judgment tests more desirable employers.

      psychometric test design

      UK and US psychometric test publishers have produced both video-based and animated SJT scenarios. Animated SJTs are easier – and therefore cheaper – for global companies to develop.

      Our consultancy work focuses on aptitude test practice and bespoke psychometric test design. We believe in the benefits of practice and ensuring fairness in testing. We, therefore, offer some practice aptitude tests and some practice psychometric tests. The intention is to promote as ‘level a playing-field’ as possible.

      Values based recruitment

      Example values-based recruitment Question – Describe an example of when you have made a decision which had a positive effect on a customer? Probes: What actions did you take? Who was involved? What was the outcome of your actions?

      Positive behavioural indicators

      • Uses their initiative.
      • Takes personal responsibility.
      • Describes the example’s context, their actions and the outcome(s).

      Negative behavioural indicators

      • Applies limited effort.
      • Only describes own actions.
      • Omits  the outcome.
      • Doesn’t describe their individual contribution.

      We always follow BPS Standards in Psychometric Test Design

      To be psychometrically sound a test must be:
      • Objective – the results obtained are not influenced by the administrator’s personal characteristics or irrelevant factors such as the colour of a test taker’s socks.
      • Standardised – the test is administered and scored according to standard procedures and people’s scores are compared to known standards.
      • Reliable – the test measures in a consistent way. The potential error is small and is quantifiable.
      • Valid. Our psychometric test design measures the characteristic(s) that it set(s) out to measure. So, if we design a sift psychometric test to select a job applicant should predict job performance. Whereas, if we design a psychometric test of verbal ability then it will predict verbal reasoning abilities.
      • Discriminating. Any of our bespoke psychometric tests designs should show clear differences between individuals on the behaviour being tested. But should not be discriminatory. In other words our psychometric test design does not unfairly discriminate against a minority group.

      Our bespoke psychometric test designs

      Example Psychometric Test Projects 

      Rob Williams has over twenty years of experience of bespoke psychometric test design. Plus ten years prior to this spent working for several of the UK’s leading test publishers. These include IBM, OPP, SHL and HireVue.British Airways blended assessment project:
      • Firstly our BA Situational judgment test design;
      • Secondly,  our Numerical reasoning test design;
      • Thirdly our Verbal reasoning test design
      • Finally our Personality questionnaire design.

      BUPA SJT Design

      • Best practice was followed throughout the design process in SJT design.
      • An SJT was produced which successfully incorporated a range of care home-specific scenarios.
      • The most suitable set of scenarios could be hand-picked at the SME panel meeting, as well as gaining buy-in and discussing implementation.
      • Providing some scenarios for telephone interview sifts.
      • Setting a suitable cut-off and validating the tool.
      EPSO Test Design
      • Development of project management test.
      • Design of IT skills-based aptitude tests.

      Psychometric test design

      Our Work Styles assessment designs

      We will work with you to design the most suitable work styles tool to suit your needs. Our Bespoke Personality Questionnaire design process aims to:
      • Firstly, include key role dimensions.
      • Secondly, reflect the personality, attitudinal and motivational aspects of the role-specific dimensions.
      • Thirdly, have face valid questions.
      • Also, to be capable of completion in 20 minutes approx.
      • And to adopt a single-stimulus question format (Likert scale)
      • Plus, adopting a normative format of scoring utilising a sten look-up table (for each personality scale)
      • And finally, using a Social Desirability scale to deal with the issue of faking or extreme scoring patterns

      Psychometric test design

      Recent situational judgement test trends

      Situational judgement tests (SJTs) have also become prevalent in graduate recruitment. These tests present scenarios to applicants and ask them to select the best and the worst thing to do next. SJT’s are very popular in the United States due to their excellent record of fairness across different ethnic groups.

      Recent personality test trends

      Candidates may also have to take a personality test as part of the recruitment process. There is a vast array of personality tests, which pose questions about a candidate’s behaviour and personal preferences. A typical question may ask whether you prefer attending parties or staying home with a good book. These personality tests help employers to determine whether a candidate has the right profile for the role.

      How companies use aptitude tests

      Aptitude tests are used by many companies as a standard part of the recruitment process. If you’re currently aplying for jobs, you’re likely to face one or more psychometric tests, measuring everything from verbal reasoning and numeracy to emotional intelligence. I would say that 90 per cent of big companies use skills and/or aptitude tests, though the kind used will depends on the role and industry you’re aplying for,’ says Rob Williams.How you perform matters. ‘Even if you wow a potential employer with a great first or second interview, the results can make or break your chances of getting hired,’ says Rob. Research backs up the claim. Nearly 90 percent of companies said they would reject candidates if the test showed them to be deficient in basic skills, according to a survey by the American Management Association.What are the most commonly used aptitude tests? The most commonly used aptitude tests measure numerical, verbal and logical reasoning,

      Graduate Aptitude test designs

      • Our first point is that a well-designed selection procedure focuses on predicting a graduate’s competence within a particular work context.
      • Secondly, that psychometric assessments only form one part of the selection procedure.
      • Our third point is that personality assessments can give an indication of how well an individual applicant will fit into the existing workplace or team.
      • Finally, psychometric assessments can assess which applicants are most suited to the demands of the vacant job in terms of both ability and personality factors.
      In fact i

      Our assessment designs – graduate psychometric test design example

      Graduate recruiters who want to minimise recruitment costs see online ability tests as an efficient and effective means of sifting the initial applicant pool.A bespoke verbal reasoning test design and numerical reasoning test design offer a reliable and standardised solution. This should ensure that an optimal number of good candidates are seen by the business at the much more expensive ‘face-to-face’ stage.

      Using standardised tests to improve your diversity of hires

      Using standardised tests in the recruitment process helps to ensure that applicants from different countries and from different ethnic groups are treated fairly.

      Aptitude test design – Employability example

      All of our psychometric test practice resources are free. So, we hope you enjoy using them!   In our opinion, there is plenty of the right type of aptitude test practice, aptitude test tips and test-taking strategies.We certainly hope you get maximum value from our free psychometric test practice resources!  Psychometric test practise works best when it’s specific to the test type and the level of difficulty of the psychometric test you will be taking.

      Best practice in assessment design

      • Our first point is that a well-designed selection procedure focuses on predicting a graduate’s competence within a particular work context.
      • Secondly, that psychometric assessments only form one part of the selection procedure.
      • Our third point is that personality assessments can give an indication of how well an individual applicant will fit into the existing workplace or team.
      • Finally, psychometric assessments can assess which applicants are most suited to the demands of the vacant job in terms of both ability and personality factors.

      Best practice uses of aptitude test data

      • Firstly, it’s fundamental to the use of any psychometric test is that users are aware of a test’s effectiveness and its known limitations.  This information is calculable through knowledge of a measure’s reliability and validity.
      • Secondly, importance is attached to test results and decisions are made using test data.
      • Thirdly, you must be sure that the tests you are using have sound credentials and have been properly developed.

      Bespoke psychometric test design

      Psychometric test design pillars

      An IQ test compares each respondent’s IQ score with a group of previous test-takers. There needs to be a standardization phase when developing any aptitude test.This standardization sample provides the norm group against which the individual scores of all later psychometric test respondents are compared. Otherwise, an ‘IQ score’ would be meaningless!The second psychometric test property is…

      Reliability

      There are two key types of psychometric reliability. In each case, ‘psychometric test reliability’ means that if I take the same test next week, my results will be similar.Internal Reliability, or Internal ConsistencyThis is the first type of psychometric test design reliability.Whether all the test items measure the same concept. It can be assessed in two ways. The first method is known as the split-half reliabilitywhich require correlating the score based on half of the test items with the score based on the other half (e.g., scores on odd and even items).An alternative method is item-total reliabilitywhich requires correlating each item score with the total score of the rest of the items.Cronbach alpha then summarises all the psychometric test reliability correlations into one figure. A test should have an alpha of at least a = .80.

      Our Bespoke psychometric test designs

      Secondly, Test-retest Reliability relates to psychometric score consistency over time. In other words, how reliably a psychometric test measures. A time gap of at least two weeks between the two measurements is key. Since some psychological characteristics change considerably over time.Then, the test re-test reliability is assessed by correlating the tests scores measured first time with the test scores measured the second time. Ability tests are expected to have a reliability of at least r = .75, yet personality tests might have somewhat lower reliability.

      Validity

      Psychometric test design validity means the test measures what it says it measures. MindX knows which personality traits are measured because we have compared our results to well-established personality tests. HireVue validates its video assessments using high performer data and job analysis results.Aptitude Test Design Reliability – is it a reliable measure?
      • Most commonly the internal consistency index coefficient alpha or its dichotomous formulation, KR-20.
      • Under most conditions, these range from 0.0 to 1.0.
      • 1.0 is a perfectly reliable measurement.
      • Although, a reliable test may still not be a valid
      Aptitude Test Design Validity – Secondly, is the test valid?A measure of what it ‘says on the tin’? In our opinion, both the initial content validation and later criterion validation analysis are vital for any bespoke psychometric test.

      Final Validity Recommendations

      We recommend collecting additional recruitment data over time so that additional validation studies can be conducted. Such as assessment centre data.There are many other types of psychometric test validation evidence, and one-off studies investigating a psychometric test’s criterion validity are common.

      Assessment Reliability

      The reliability of any exercise depends upon many factors:
      • Quality of the competency framework.
      • Use of experienced and well-briefed / well-trained assessors.

      Biodata approach to psychometric test design

      • Such biodata test designs were popular in the 1970’s/80’s in the UK., but fell out of fashion due to concerns about face validity.
      • Face validity is how job-relevant a test’s questions appear to be.
      • Assessing this is difficult because of the way that the biodata approach to psychometric tezst design fits questions to job performance.

      Biodata example questions

      • Asking about previous working and life history facts.
      • Biodata questions can include personal attitudes, values, beliefs.
      • There are therefore both autographical and biographical perspectives.
      • For example, how effective previous working relationships were with managers and/or colleagues.

      psychometric test design

      Personality Values Test Design

      We also design values based  assessments. Values impact goal content whereas personality traits impact the efforts that individuals make towards their goals.

      Ability Tests Introduction

      • Often employers are interested in your aptitude or potential to do a task.
      • In this case, they may use assessment methods that aim to simulate aspects of that task.

      Personality Questionnaire Introduction

      • These measure behavioural preferences of how you prefer to work.
      • There’s no right or wrong answer.
      • That said, of course, certain behaviours are more suited to particular jobs.

      Situational Judgement Test Introduction

      • These psychometric tests assess your ability to choose the most appropriate action in workplace situations.
      • Respondents read a scenario / view an animation;
      • Then select the Best and Worst responses to that aspecific work situation.

      Intro to Assessment Centres

      Assessment centres have a well-proven track record for recruiting new employees and selecting existing staff for promotion. Research supports their use as one of the most valid and fair processes available to occupational psychologists – if used in accordance with best practice.An assessment centre involves written exercise, intray exercise, presentation exercise, role play, and / or a group exercise. Group exercises and presentation exercises are particularly popular for graduate assessment centres.

      Assessment Centre candidate pov

      • Assessment centre candidates complete a range of assessment exercises, which are observed by assessors.
      • Trained assessors rate each candidate’s assessment for each competency – relevant to that exercise – from the complete competency job list.
      • Such Assessment Centre Exercises can be delivered either directly or as a virtual assessment centre.
      • In which case you will be asked to complete each virtual assessment exercise remotely.
      • Video calls simulate the ‘normal’ candidate-assessor interactions of a direct assessment centre.

        Intro to Interviews

      • The most likely interview questions will ask for specific details of your work experience to date.
      • Plus, the specific role competencies of the job you are applying for.
      • Be honest and use relevant examples from your career, studies.

      Our free personality self-assessments:

      Our other psychometric test design specialities

      What is involved in clerical aptitude test, spelling, grammar and accuracy on paper.
      Registered Office: Rob Williams, 31 Bruton Way, Ealing, London, W13 0BYCompanies House Registration No: 6572976