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Welcome to our law jobs and LNAT Practice tests page.

       


      We hope you find out LNAT practice test resources useful!

      Here is the official LNAT Preparation site. This is the best place to find details of any changes in the process. It is also worthwhile to check the LNAT Onscreen.

      LNAT Practice Test Tips

      We also partner with JobTestPrep to offer their premium LNAT Practice Tests

      • Read through each passage. Make a mental note of those statements that are facts. Plus, those “weaker” statements which only express an opinion.
      • Any verbal reasoning test requires careful reading of both the passage and each question. Critical verbal reasoning tests require even more careful reading!
      • Look out for keywords in the questions and ensure that you pick up on any questions that are phrased negatively. For example, the critical reasoning item, All of the following are assumptions made by the author, except for which one?
      • Sometimes a question will highlight particular words in bold text. Here you need to ensure that this emphasis is recognized by your answer.
      • In many job roles that require verbal reasoning skills one of the specific abilities required is that of critical reasoning.

      LNAT Practice Tests

      We hope you enjoy our free LNAT practice tips and LNAT practice test below.

      Here is our LNAT PRACTICE TEST 1 free download.

      REVIEW YOUR LNAT PRACTICE  TEST 1 ANSWERS 

      Here is our LNAT PRACTICE TEST 2 free download.

      REVIEW YOUR LNAT PRACTICE test 2 ANSWERS.

      Here is our LNAT PRACTICE TEST 3 free download.

      REVIEW YOUR LNAT PRACTICE test 3 ANSWERS.

      Here is our  LNAT PRACTICE TEST 4 free download.

      REVIEW YOUR LNAT PRACTICE TEST 4 ANSWERS

      LNAT question types

      There are four broad types of LNAT question:

      • Interpretation LNAT question type
      • Summary LNAT question type
      • Deduction and Inference LNAT question types
      • Assumptions LNAT question type

      (1) Interpretation

      Which sentence best summarizes the passage?

      • Find the word which could be substituted for another in the passage?
      • Which of the following words is the most suitable replacement?
      • What’s meant by the following term?
      • What fact is included in the passage?

      (2) Summary

      What is the main point the passage is making?

      • Which of the following statements best summarizes the second paragraph?
      • What best summarises what the author is saying in the last paragraph?
      • Do any statements not form part of the passage’s argument?

      (3) Deduction and Inference

      It’s not just the person writing a newspaper article who needs to use critical reasoning skills – the person reading the article needs to apply their own critical reasoning skills too. Discerning readers will assess whether the journalist is making an argument is based on facts or is putting forth a subjective opinion influenced by the newspaper’s bias towards a particular political party or against a certain group of people.

      An astute reader always asks: Does the writer’s overall conclusion follow on from the evidence and facts presented?

      This question is an example of logical deduction or deductive reasoning – the linking of one or more statements, or premises, to make a logically sound conclusion. If the argument’s premises are true, then it is logically impossible for the conclusion reached to be false.

      On the other hand, inductive reasoning or inference is based on discerning what is probable or what is likely to be true from true premises. Critical reasoning involves applying both inductive and deductive reasoning to arguments.

      (4) Assumptions

      • What can be inferred about X from the passage?
      • Which of the following can be deduced from the passage?
      • Find the assumption is made in the passage?
      • Which statements lend support to the passage’s argument?
      • Whose opinion is expressed by the author?
      LNAT practice and critical reasoning practice. Woman analysing painting

      Critical Reasoning Test Introduction

      • Critical reasoning tests, such as the LNAT, ask you to identify assumptions, inferences and the points made within “overall” arguments.
      • The LNAT is not designed to assess any knowledge of laws or any legal ability.
      • You need to answer 42 questions.
      • You will be expected to interpret shades of meaning. Also, the “grey” areas within the arguments outlined in 12 passages.

      Critical reasoning is quite literally applying a critic’s eye (i.e. critical analysis) to verbal information. It encompasses the logical analysis of the following features of complex written arguments and viewpoints: assumptions; inferences; opinions; facts and interpretations.

      The term “critical reasoning” might sound a bit intimidating, but it is a skill you can learn. With the right practice, most individuals can develop their skills sufficiently to pass this type of verbal critical reasoning test.

      Critical Thinking skills

      These are a learned skill. With the right training, most individuals who have an average or above the ability to learn can develop reasonable critical thinking skills. Critical thinking skills include the ability to define a problem clearly, the ability to formulate and select relevant hypotheses and to judge the validity of inferences. A good grasp of these skills enables a person to ‘think on his feet’, to assess evidence and arguments and to communicate clearly. The skill of thinking critically is known to play an important part in most executive and technical positions.

      Need more practice?

       The official LNAT preparation Website has tips on practice:

      LNAT Hints

      and a critical reasoning practice test to try at;

      LNAT Practice

      There is also the site for the slightly different LSAT test for admission to Law Schools in the United States. Their official Website also has critical reasoning practice questions, see;

      Critical reasoning test tips

      Everyone uses these skills sometimes, but some job roles specifically require a high level of verbal critical reasoning. For example, many senior managerial and executive positions require you to assess evidence effectively and to communicate your position clearly.

      Lawyers, in particular, need excellent critical reasoning skills. In fact, this is such an important prerequisite that a specific verbal critical reasoning test – the LNAT – is used for entry to the legal profession.

      Barristers, for example, use critical reasoning to:

      • Remain objective and not to be prejudiced by their own opinions.
      • Analyze large amounts of verbal information to build a case for their client.
      • Identify the different ways legal doctrine can be interpreted.
      • Present their evidence in court and state their conclusion based on it.

      A judge (or jury) will, in turn, use their critical reasoning skills to balance all the evidence for and against the accused and reach a verdict.

      Journalists also need to have a high level of critical reasoning skills. When commenting on a current affairs debate, a journalist will typically present all sides of the argument. After careful thought, and backed up by evidence, they then commit their own analysis to the page.

      LNAT Test Taking Strategies

      Improving the speed with which you can digest complex prose will help your critical reasoning test performance. Read the passage quickly the first time to get a feel for the main points. Then read the passage a second time more carefully, mentally noting the key content of each paragraph. Focus on the core of the argument and its supporting evidence, together with the author’s stance on the issue.

      While you need to absorb the critical reasoning test passages as efficiently as possible, that does not mean that you need to rush your answers. Quite the opposite, since there will be many different question formats. It is very important to double-check that you are 100% clear on what the question is asking for.

      Passing the LNAT Test

      To pass a critical reasoning test you need to understand the development of an argument – in particular, what points provide factual support. Reading commentary on political, social and economic debates will certainly improve your understanding.

      As you read such material, ask yourself:

      • How are individual’s opinions, counteracts and factual evidence expressed?
      • Is there one or more argument? One or more conclusion?
      • Look out for any assumptions and consider which specific pieces of information are being used to make a conclusion.
      • Is each piece of information reliable? Would you draw the same conclusion yourself?
      • What additional information would you need to frame a counterargument?

      Do not let your own general knowledge lead you astray. It’s vital that you do not let any of your personal opinions or your general knowledge influence your answers even slightly. This recommendation applies even if it seems that the correct answer is in direct contradiction to what you know or believe to be true.

      To summarise, these are the skills you need to demonstrate to succeed in a critical reasoning test:

      • Separating facts from inferences and opinions
      • Identifying the implications of a factual statement
      • Making logical deductions from a passage of prose

      Watson Glaser Critical Reasoning Test Practice

      We have tips for critical verbal reasoning Watson Glaser format questions.

      Also, here’s some practice verbal reasoning test sites – most offering general verbal reasoning test practice – as follows: Guardian verbal reasoning test practice.

      LNAT practice and critical reasoning practice. Two men discussing legal documents

      LNAT test strategies Part I

      A critical reasoning test, like the LNAT, typically asks you to use different types of logical reasoning to “test” the accuracy and the interpretation presented in the passage of a particular topic. Read the passage quickly the first time to get a feel for the main points. Then read the passage a second time more carefully, mentally noting the key content of each paragraph.

      There follow some elementary points that are hopefully easy for you to remember. The practice question section will also give you a feel of the type of text that you will need to understand in a critical reasoning test. Such practice, together with your raised awareness of what to expect, can certainly improve your performance in most critical thinking tests. Unfortunately, there isn’t any secret formula for passing this type of verbal reasoning test.

      With all psychometric tests, it is important to read and fully understand the test instructions before starting the test. With such complex test formats as these, it’s worth repeating this advice again. There are many different types of question format when it comes to critical thinking tests and you must know in advance exactly what each type of question is asking for.

      LNAT test strategies Part II

      • Firstly, do not let your own general knowledge lead you stray. It’s vital that you do not let any of your personal opinions or your general knowledge influence your answers even slightly.
      • Secondly, expect that each passage contains at least two sides from the “undecided debate” of a contentious issue.
      • Thirdly, improving the speed with which you can digest complex prose will help your test performance.
      • Fourthly, focus on the core of the argument and its supporting evidence, together with the author’s stance on the issue.
      • Fourth, whilst you need to absorb the test passages as efficiently as possible, that does not mean that you need to rush your answers.
      • Fifth, double-check that you are 100% clear on what the question is asking for.

      Also, do take care when interpreting the meaning of complex words.

      Finally, look out for any words that imply something absolute, such as “always”, “never”, “all”. Do not confuse these with similar words or phrases that are not so definitive (e.g. “almost always, most of the time, invariably” and “often”) and the weak forms (e.g. “sometimes”, “some of the time” etc).

      Following on from the above point you need to understand the development of an argument. In particular what points are relevant to a specific argument and what points are irrelevant.

      Critical reasoning test strategies

      Familiarise yourself with how journalists write a comment and Opinion articles online or in the broadsheet newspapers.

      – How are individual’s opinions, counteracts and factual evidence expressed?

      – Is there one or more argument? One or more conclusion?

      – Is each piece of information reliable? Would you draw the same conclusion yourself?

      – What additional information would you need to frame a counterargument?

      LNAT practice and critical reasoning practice. People analysing empty frames on a wall.

      LNAT Preparation

      You can exercise the relevant parts of your brain very well by reading a quality newspaper every day and thinking about the issues that are raised. What assumptions are being made? What information is being relied on to draw which conclusion? How
      difficult would it be to reach the opposite conclusion from the same information?

      We recommend that you read a quality general daily newspaper (in English) every day, or as often as you can, and think about the issues that are raised. What assumptions are being made? What information is being relied on to draw which conclusions? How would you frame a counterargument? Reading a quality daily newspaper will also help you to be aware of the world around you.

      LNAT practice and critical reasoning practice. People at computers with supervisor.

      LNAT Essay topics

      The LNAT essay topics will not be specifically about current affairs, and you will not be judged by what facts you know. But knowing how the world ticks, in general terms, will help you to write intelligently about a host of different topics. On the right, we have listed some newspapers worth considering. You can read the online versions (usually freely available, although registration may be required). If you do read the online versions, remember to read the comment pieces as well as the news. (One question you might ask yourself: What exactly is the difference between news and comment? Is the contrast really apparent in practice?)

      The other thing you can usefully do is practise. This has two objectives: the first is to familiarise yourself with the format of the LNAT and its questions; the second is to familiarise yourself with the kind of thinking that the LNAT requires. We offer our own practice test to help you and our own commentary on the answers. You can also try freely-available questions from other sources that are similar to LNAT questions.

      What does the LNAT test? 

      The purpose of a critical verbal reasoning test is to assess reasoning abilities when applied to a complex passage of text. You also need to analyse the different points within the passage. How would you evaluate each of these points? What logical conclusions
      can you draw from the information that you have read? As you can see this goes beyond the understanding of the text that has formed the basis for other verbal reasoning tests discussed so far. The type of language and vocabulary used in a verbal reasoning test should be equivalent to the job or course that is being applied for.

      LSAT Prep Materials

      The Open University Website has free, online courses for writing. See:

      How to Find a Specialized LNAT Tutor Online

      Hiring expert tutor to aid preparations for the LNAT test can significantly contribute to good scores. Several tutors usually advertise on online platforms to reach potential students. However, some individuals posing as tutors are not experts in LNAT and may mislead candidates. Therefore, applicants should know methods of identifying specialized tutors. It is essential to conduct background checks on a tutor before seeking his or her services.

      A potential tutor should have adequate experience in LNAT tests. Exceptional understanding of LNAT tests enables a tutor to give students helpful knowledge. Such individuals should be result oriented as students seek their services to obtain good grades. Referral by comrades can connect an individual with a specialized tutor, Therefore, a candidate may inquire from other students receiving similar tutoring services and learn about their experience.

      LNAT practice. Books scale and gavel on top..

      Law School admissions depend on LNAT test scores

      Many highly qualified candidates apply for admission to various law programs in law schools. Therefore, LNAT critical reasoning tests provide a suitable solution to this problem as it ensures that law schools choose individuals for various programs depending on abilities displayed by their LNAT scores.

      Pearson VUE usually provides the LNAT scores to universities on 20th October. Admission tutors of each university then use these scores as part of candidates’ application, Along with other admission criteria, universities use the LNAT test marks to select suitable students (LNAT, n.d). Therefore, universities can utilize LNAT in the best way that satisfies their admission requirements or policies. Notably, LNAT is not a replacement to A levels but used together with other criteria including formal qualifications, performance at interview, the information provided on the UCAS, and personal statement.

      LNAT critical reasoning questions

      Aptitude test practice books

      Firstly, in our opinion, this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests.

      Secondly, in our opinion, this is the best aptitude test practice book for Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests.

      Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests gif

      Critical Reasoning Tips Toolkit