Tag Archives: personality test design

In this personality test design tag, you can firstly find all of our most useful and up-to-date personality test information.

Secondly, you can find all of the tips and practice tests on our site.

We hope you find both of these useful.

Rob Williams Assessment Ltd specialise in designing highly predictive psychometric solutions. In particular, situational judgement test design, realistic job preview design, aptitude test design and personality questionnaire design.

We work across a wide range of sectors and job roles. Our tailor-made psychometric offerings are as unique as our clients’ organisations.

Our organisation prides itself on client satisfaction. We have many positive LinkedIn reviews from our big client projects.

Big5

Big Five Personality Profiling

  • Extroversion: Introversion, shy, quiet, withdrawn, untalkative, inhibited, VERSUS extroversion, talkative, verbal, sociable, outgoing, dominant, assertive.
  • Agreeableness: Sympathetic, kind, warm, understanding, sincere, considerate, VERSUS self-centred, non-conformist, unsympathetic, unkind, harsh, insincere.
  • Conscientiousness: careful, organised, neat, orderly, systematic, precise, practical, VERSUS risk-taking, experimenting, disorganised, disorderly, careless, absent-minded.
  • Emotional stability: emotionally stable, un-envious, relaxed, optimistic, unemotional, VERSUS anxious, neurotic, nervous, tense, fidgety.
  • Intellect: creative, imaginative, complex, philosophical, intuitive, abstract thinking, open to experience, VERSUS uncreative, un-intellectual, unintelligent, shallow, ignorant, short-sighted, sensual, concrete thinking.

Personality is at the heart of how we deal with the world. As individuals our unique personalities are powerful predictors of the way in which we respond across a broad range of different situations.

In short, personality can be seen as the underlying pattern of thoughts and feelings that influence what we are likely to do. For personality to affect our behaviour in this way, it must also be consistent and stable, although obviously it will be influenced by context and culture.

At a theoretical level psychologists have studied personality for over 100 years. Comparatively recently, over the last 50 years, a consensus has emerged and there is now agreement that the Five Factor Model (FFM) represents the best structure for human personality. Psychologists agree that these five factors capture the most important and basic personality differences between people; or as some researchers describe them, they are the ‘primary colours’ of personality (Trickey & Hogan, 1998).

Openness to Experience:

Playful, curious, imaginative, creative, open- minded, seeks novelty, forward looking/ visionary.

Conscientiousness:

Orderly, committed, confident (sense of mastery), achievement oriented, reliable, self- disciplined.

Extraversion:

Active, energetic, thrill-seeking, enthusiastic, assertive, interactive, friendly.

Agreeableness:

Accommodating, loyal/trusting, compassionate, altruistic, steady, cooperative, forgiving/tolerant.

Emotional Stability: Calm, even-tempered, positive, resilient/robust, deliberate, easy- going, regulated.

Like many concepts in psychology, there are a number of people who can claim to be the fathers of the FFM, but it’s worth mentioning that the original breakthrough came as a result of the re- analysis of work conducted by Raymond Cattell in the late 1940’s (Cattell, 1946; Russell & Karol, 1994). He constructed a personality model based on the analysis of natural language. The idea was that a

‘lexical’ approach would identify an exhaustive list of words used to describe personality, and thus of all the possible personality traits.

Personality And Life

To illustrate the richness of the relationship between personality and a range of human attributes, here are some example findings for each of the Big Five factors:

Openness to Experience

Openness is related to a person’s in-built values system. People who are ‘open to experience’ are tolerant and accepting and see everyone as equally deserving of justice and equality (Douglas, Bore & Munro, 2016).

Conscientiousness

Conscientious people respect orderliness, duty, achievement, and self-discipline, and are concerned with increasing their competence. The factor is also related to conformity and tradition (Roccas, Sagiv, Schwartz & Knafo, 2002).

With respect to the rest of the Big Five, Conscientiousness correlates weakly (and negatively) with Neuroticism, and Agreeableness. It does not appear to be related to the other factors (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Extraversion

Extroverts are often assertive, active and sociable. They can also be hedonistic, and actively seek excitement and pleasure.

with Openness to Experience (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Agreeableness

Those with Agreeable personalities place an emphasis on compassion, generosity and trust. They are less concerned with power, achievement or ego-related activities.

Generally high levels of agreeableness are related to good life adjustment (Soldz & Vaillant, 1999).

Neuroticism

Neuroticism, or the lack of Emotional Stability over time, is negatively related to:

  • Self-esteem, self-efficacy and internal locus of control (Judge, Erez, Bono, & Thoresen, 2002).

The reactive and impulsive aspects of Neuroticism relate positively to:

  • Hedonism (pleasure without responsibility) and negatively to benevolence and conformity (Roccas, Sagiv, Schwartz, & Knafo, 2002).

Long term research has demonstrated that Neuroticism is related:

  • Inability to cease using alcohol or drugs, being unable to adjust to problems
  • Mental health issues (Soldz & Vaillant, 1999.)
  • With regard to the other factors, Neuroticism correlates weakly and negatively with Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. It also has a weak negative relationship with Extraversion and Openness (Van der Linden, Te Nijenhuis & Bakker, 2010).

Personality And Work

  • Predictive of both job competencies and more specific work behaviours
  • Such as: attendance, worker turnover, management potential, leadership and occupational health.
  • Correlations run from -1.0 (perfect negative) to +1.0 (perfect positive). Not much, especially continuous attributes like human personality, ever gets close to -1.0 or +1.0.

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Financial Personality online private tuition tools

Financial Well-Being

There are many forms of well-being: psychological well-being, psychological safety and financial well-being are of particular interest.

financial well-being tips

These six financial well-being tips encourage a slower-paced life. The consequences of which should be being more mindful with your money.

Our top financial well-being tips

1. Learn the basics of money management

You can’t be intentional with your money if you don’t understand the basics. Think of money as

  • a tool to reach your lifestyle goals.
  • you can learn about it.
  • understand it
  • use it to achieve your dreams.
  • BUT don’t let it overwhelm you or control your life.

The more you know, the more confident you’ll be in using your money with clear intent.

2. Stick to your personal values

This means aiming to be:

  • guided by those core beliefs that bring meaning and purpose to your life.
  • For example, having a healthy lifestyle, being helpful in your local community or prioritising your family time.
  • Make a list of your top three priorities and connect them with how you spend your money.

3. Be proactive

This means:

  • looking daily at your bank balance.
  • checking up on your pension.
  • coming up with an action plan to get out of debt.
  • recalibrating your investment portfolio.
  • setting a weekly money date to go over your expenses.

4. Recognise your spending triggers

  • Go through your bank statements for the past three months, and highlight all your unplanned and impulsive expenses.
  • Think back to what you were feeling when you made the decision to buy.

Recognising what drives our triggers helps us take pause the next time we feel the need to spend impulsively.

However, it’s also important to make space in your budget for spontaneous, fun spending, to avoid feeling resentful and deprived.

5. Use savings targets

Saving is hard enough as it is, but it’s harder still when we don’t know what we’re saving for. It’s important to set goals and time frames for your savings.

It also helps to keep them in separate, labelled accounts. Investing for the long-term – your retirement, for example- can feel even harder than saving.

A trick I’ve learned to keep me motivated is to try and establish a connection with my future self: picturing what I’ll be like, the life I’ll want to be living, my financial priorities and lifestyle choices. While it’s important to live in the moment, we shouldn’t neglect our future needs.

5. Prioritise your mental wellbeing

When we’re hurting or fearful, we’re more inclined to make poor financial decisions. Prioritising your mental wellbeing every day, not only on the weekend or holidays, is the cornerstone of good money habits.

Exercise regularly, use breathing techniques, set clear boundaries at work, go to therapy if you need to and connect with yourself in whatever way that works for you. Practising intentional spending is much easier when our headspace allows us to do so.

Our financial wellbeing is just as important as our mental and physical wellbeing. Being able to meet current and ongoing financial obligations and reach our goals helps us feel more secure, enabling us to enjoy our lives that much more.

While our busy lifestyles can feel all-consuming, making the time to practice and appreciate a slower pace of life not only helps us adjust how we spend our money, it also makes it much clearer to see what truly matters to us in the long term

Financial well-being subcategories

  1. Financial Well-Being – Security
  2. Freedom of Choice

Choices and options give you happiness. Not weatch per se.

  1. Present and Future

We dont know what’s around the corner. Which is why people are often advised to invest in bricks and mortar.

Financial Well-Being Strategy

Consider different areas of your life and how to attirbute your money:

  • Living (food, shelter, utilities) – 55 % according to the reliable Rowntree Foundation.
  • Leisure (hobbies, interests and socialising)
  • Learning;
  • Financial Freedom
  • The What If factor

Other key consdierations are managing debt, and giving to charities.

Bloomberg Financial Test

The first thing I noticed was that the international test publisher Hogrefe Group describing the role that personality plays in trading (on the financial stock markets).

The Bloomberg Financial Test  made me interested because it is a measure of “financial aptitude” – not a personality test.

Also, Barclays are doing some interesting personality research in this area. Primarily, individual financial preferences for investing. This personality research is very innovative. I predict that other financial institutions may offer similar personality-based profiling for their investors.

Work meeting

Pandemic impact on personal finances

The coronavirus outbreak has sent a shockwave through the finances of millions of people in the UK.

The effect has not been universal, nor has it been equal. Your age, your job, where you live, and the pre-virus state of your finances will all make a difference to how well you can cope.

For a start, there has been the effect on income. For those who work, the amount of money coming in depends mostly on their wages.

More than nine million people have been off work but paid by the state to stay in their jobs – in other words, placed on furlough.

The government, to date, has paid 80% of someone’s wages. Not every employer can afford to top this up.

Our other personality test blogs

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Financial well-being

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Change

Welcome to our Change Readiness Self-Assessment and MBTI Response Style to Change Self-Assessment.

Self-Assessments

Change isn’t always easy, but it’s wrong to assume everyone will have a hard time. When you feel stuck or frustrated by expected changes, make sure to check your core values / beliefs to get a better understanding.

Here’s some core beliefs / values that occur quite frequently:

  • I must not fail. Failure is a sign of weakness.
  • Asking for help would give a bad impression. I need to take responsibility myself.
  • If I am not in charge then something bad will happen. Certainly, things will go in the wrong direction.
  • I need to have an answer. Not saying or doing anything is not an option.
  • Everything must be perfect. Otherwise it’s wrong.
  • I must prioritise my child’s needs. I must give my children the best possible.

Therapists refer to these as the hit thoughts of their clients. We will return to cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) shortly.

virtual burnout self-assessment

Once you understand which core beliefs drive your ‘frustration’, you can evaluate whether this is a core belief that’s helping your response style to change. Or not.

Then ask yourself these questions:

  • Is this rule helping me right now. Or is it a damaging core belief to keep holding… since it makes me too rigid whenever I’m expected to adapt my behaviour.
  • How did the rule develop… was it driven by my current company or career choice? Or was this created within my upbringing environment… soemthing I inherited from my parents?

This is a form of CBT in which we can challenge our negative thinking.

The next stage is to consdier which alternative rules or beliefs would be suitable replacements.

MBTI Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

What’s your response style to change?

A varied change response can be a good thing and each change response style has strengths you can leverage.

Try our Response Style to Change tool here.

Coaching other’s response style to change

You may be managing someone who is very resistant to change. Speak to them one-on-one in order to

  • Hear their personal story.
  • Ask them what’s behind this thinking.
  • Allow their core values / beliefs to surface.
  • Gain key insights into their response style to change and what’s behing their intentions to resist any form of change at work.
  • Help you in the future to have the right conversation. Rather than any more frustrations.

MBTI Change Readiness

MBTI’s ENFP type

Change is an exciting word for ENFPs. These individuals are one of seven personality types who are most likely to be excited by change. They are also fond of variety, so going somewhere new, trying their hand at a new skill, or being around a new set of people piques their curiosity. Routine, everyday experiences can make them bored and de-motivated. If the change involves moving to a new location, they may struggle with saying goodbye to friends and loved ones or letting go of relationships.

  • Give them time to talk about the change and all the possibilities and implications related to it.
  • Explain the overall reason for the change. Where are you headed? What is the goal?
  • Paint a picture or vision of where you see yourself (or them) in the future.
  • Recognize the personal impact of this change. How will their personal needs be dealt with?
  • Demonstrate that you care.
  • Include them in planning.
  • Give them plenty of options and be prepared to answer lots of questions.
  • Understand that they like options, flexibility, and an open-ended plan.

Change Readiness Self-Assessment

MBTI’s ENTP type

ENTPs get a rush of excitement when a change or new option is put on the table. Rarely scared of a risk, ENTPs are one of seven personality types most likely to appreciate change. They tend to get bored by a repetitive routine or a predictable lifestyle, so any time a new option is presented they tend to respond with enthusiasm and curiosity rather than dread.

  • Give them a chance to be heard and have a voice in decisions.
  • Keep lines of communication open – answer questions.
  • Give them a general plan or direction to tinker with and develop.
  • They appreciate options, and will likely generate more and more.
  • Give them an opportunity to envision the future and influence changes.
  • Explain the logic of the change. Why is this happening?
  • Explain the systematic changes involved in the development.
  • Explain the goals and overall structure of the change.
  • Be fair and equitable.
  • Give them time to gather information and explore options.
  • Give them room to question goals and adjust plans as the process unfolds.

Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

MBTI’s INFP type

INFPs need a little time alone to reflect on changes and figure out whether the changes align with their values and desires. They hate feeling pushed or pressured into anything without having a chance to ruminate on it. That said, INFPs are one of seven types most likely to be excited by change. They enjoy variety, new possibilities, and tend to get bored when life feels monotonous and repetitive. The biggest struggle for INFPs is leaving loved ones if moving locations is a part of the change. They tend to be very attached to their relationships and will need a process or method of maintaining relationships.

MBTI Change Readiness self-assessment

  • Give them time to think through the change before asking for an immediate response.
  • Ask them what they think about everything related to the change.
  • Give them time to reflect on the changes before taking action.
  • Explain the future vision you have. What is this change going to mean for the future? Stimulate their imagination by painting a vision of the future.
  • Give them a general direction, but don’t overwhelm them with details and structure.
  • Recognize the personal impacts this change might have on them.
  • Explain the values that underlie the change. Are the motivations ethical?
  • Explain the general parameters of the change. Give them options.
  • Loosen up, don’t micro-manage them, don’t seem panicky.

MBTI Change Readiness

MBTI’s INTP type

Change can be very exciting for INTPs. These types are typically flexible and willing to take smart risks. They can become easily bored by everyday, repetitive experiences and enjoy the challenge involved with change. What new options will it present? What creative avenues will be opened up? As introverts, however, INTPs need time alone to process the change before giving an immediate response. They want to ruminate about the change and all the implications and effects before they jump on board.

  • INTPs are very independent and self-sufficient individuals. So give them time to reflect on this decision and have a voice in changes made.
  • Promote written, well thought-out communication or a one-on-one discussion about the change.
  • Give them the overall rationale behind the change. What’s the big picture?
  • Allow them the general plan and let them tinker with it and imagine new possibilities or options related to it.
  • Give them the logical reasons behind the change and why it is taking place.
  • Demonstrate that the leadership in charge of the change is competent and capable.
  • Be fair and equitable in the change.
  • Give them the opportunity to gather as much information as possible.
  • Give them room to adjust goals or implement plans as the process continues.

Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

MBTI’s ENFJ type

Ever planful and future-focused, ENFJs are initially excited about change. In fact, they are one of seven personality types most likely to be excited by change. They enjoy working over the details involved in a change and getting on board with planning and implementation. They are skilled at making sure everyone feels heard in the change process and are good at making sure personal needs are accounted for and developments run along at a smooth pace. That said, ENFJs can feel very stressed during change, especially if there are personal factors that negatively impact them or others. If the people around them are stressed or anxious about the change they can get so wrapped up in trying to fix things for other people that they burn out or feel emotionally overwhelmed.

  • Discuss the personal impacts of the change directly with them. Ask how you can help.
  • Explain ways that the change will benefit the people involved.
  • Show that you are cooperative in working with others. Explain that the ENFJ won’t have to handle other people’s feelings entirely on their own.
  • Communicate regularly about the change.
  • Paint a picture of the future once the change is implemented.
  • Ask their advice for any future implications that may arise related to the change.
  • Include them in planning and implementation.
  • Demonstrate appreciation and support.
  • Give them a clear plan of action, with specific goals and expectations.
  • Give them a time frame and a statement of priorities.

MBTI Change Readiness

MBTI’s ENTJ type

Decisive and analytical, ENTJs enjoy the challenge and possibility that change provides. They are usually quick to question the logic of the change to make sure it is sound. They need time to envision where the change will lead in the future, and they will appreciate being able to discuss this with others. These types are usually valued during change because of their ability to manage transitions effectively and efficiently without getting emotional or distracted. They are skilled at implementing structure, staying on task, and meeting deadlines. They are also a good sounding board for discussing implications of where the change will lead and whether or not it is a smart move.

MBTI Change Readiness

  • Explain your reasons for the change. They dislike meaningless change but are excited about pragmatic, progressive change.
  • Discuss the change in person and ask for their thoughts and ideas.
  • Give them a voice in the change.
  • Give them opportunities to design the change you want to see happen.
  • Focus on the big picture.
  • Explain the systematic differences that will be put into place because of the change.
  • Demonstrate competent and confident leadership.
  • Give them a clear, concise plan of action.
  • Give a clear time frame and a statement of priorities.
  • Show that you are taking action to get the change in place.

Change Readiness self-Assessment

MBTI’s INFJ type

INFJs can have mixed reactions to change. While they enjoy being able to toy with a new vision or idea for the future, they can feel hesitant if they see implications that could be negative. They need more time to acclimate to change than many other types. They want to think through their position, analyze the potential effects, and consider how the change will impact them personally and the people around them. INFJs feel most motivated to change when they see a vision or image of the future that looks appealing and novel. They don’t like predictability or monotony and are excited by new options and possibilities – they just need time to mentally engage with the change and toy with the connections and impacts that it will have on everyone.

  • Present change to them one-on-one if possible.
  • Give them time to process the change and think it over before expecting an immediate response.
  • Explain the big picture – what will the future look like when this change is in place?
  • Give them opportunities to design the future and influence changes creatively.
  • Recognize the impacts this change might have on them or others.
  • Explain the values and ethics underlying the change. Is this the conscientious choice?
  • Show appreciation and support.
  • Give them a clear idea of priorities, outcomes, and goals.
  • Give a specific time frame for them to look forward to and plan for.

Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

MBTI’s INTJ type

Long-term planning is a gift of the INTJ personality type. They can be excited by change, but they need time to figure out their strategy and predict implications and likely effects. Unexpected, surprise changes can irritate INTJs because they want time to create a plan and avoid mistakes that come from impulsivity and haste. INTJs enjoy toying with a new idea or possibility, so change can be exciting for them. They also enjoy the challenge that change provides – it gives them something new to figure out, a new future goal or vision to bring to actuality. They just need to be sure that the people handling the change are competent and will respect their insights into the situation.

MBTI Change Readiness

  • Give them time alone to reflect on the change and analyze it before expecting a response.
  • Show that you have thought things through and given careful consideration to the implications of the change.
  • Explain the overall rationale and reason for the change.
  • Give them opportunities to influence and plan.
  • Explain the systematic changes that will go into effect.
  • Explain the goals – Where will this change lead to in the future?
  • Be fair to everyone involved in the change.
  • Give a clear, concise plan of action.
  • Be clear on your time frame. Don’t be wishy-washy or vague.
  • Don’t surprise them with the change.
  • Ask for their opinions and ideas.

Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

MBTI’s ESFP type

ESFPs have a knack for adapting to change and seeing the opportunities involved in it. These types enjoy variety and novelty and tend to get bored if life feels too repetitive or predictable. That said, they don’t like having changed forced on them, and they will want to have the freedom to make up their own mind about it and figure out whether it aligns with their values. They’ll want to know what options this change will provide, what exciting opportunities will open up, and how it will impact their relationships.

  • Talk to them about what’s going on and get them involved.
  • Keep lines of communication open and let them have a voice.
  • Give them real facts and data to explain why the change is taking place.
  • Be very specific and give a realistic picture of what to expect.
  • Be very clear about the expectations, roles, and potential responsibilities.
  • Recognize the impact this change will have on them and the people around them.
  • Explain the ethics and values behind the change. Is this the morally right thing to do?
  • Demonstrate that you care.
  • Give them some flexibility and room to explore options.
  • Don’t be rigid or panicky as this will set them on edge.

Change Readiness self-assessment

MBTI’s ESTP type

Change and variety are thrilling to ESTP individuals. These types get a rush of excitement from a new adventure or challenge. In fact, according to the MBTI® Manual, these are one of seven types most likely to enjoy change. ESTPs tend to get bored if their environments become predictable or mundane. Rather than repetition and consistency, they enjoy novel experiences and a mixture of tactical and strategic risk-taking. However, they don’t like having their decisions made for them. They’re more likely to create change or instigate it rather than just follow along on someone else’s plan. If they’re going to pursue a life-altering change then they’ll want strong, logical reasons to do so.

  • Give them time to talk about the changes and keep lines of communication open.
  • Let them have a voice in the process.
  • Give them real data and facts as to why the change is going to happen.
  • Be specific and detailed when explaining your reasons.
  • Give a realistic picture of what the future will look like.
  • Be logical – explain why this change is happening and discuss the systematic changes.
  • Be fair to everyone involved.
  • Demonstrate confidence and competence.
  • Let them gather more information as needed.
  • Don’t be rigid or micro-manage during the process.

MBTI Change Readiness

MBTI’s ISFP type

ISFPs can feel hesitant when new changes come their way. While they are typically adventurous and flexible, they are also deeply attached to their loved ones and the lives they create for themselves. They need time to reflect on change, to analyze the implications and discern how it will affect their personal relationships. They want to feel that there is a meaningful reason to pursue a change, and they need to feel supported and given reasonable facts and specifics about why the change needs to happen in the first place.

  • Discuss the change one-on-one and then give them time to process it alone afterward.
  • Don’t expect them to have an immediate answer.
  • Give them specifics and facts to explain your reasoning for the change.
  • Give them a realistic picture of what the future will look like with these changes in place.
  • Recognize the personal impacts of the change.
  • Be supportive and appreciative.
  • Explain the values that instigated the change. Are there any ethical reasons for it?
  • Don’t be controlling or overly rigid.

MBTI Change Readiness self-assessment

MBTI’s ISTP type

Well thought-out change and new opportunities tend to be very appealing to ISTPs. They don’t mind switching things up or pursuing a new challenge, but they dislike change that seems emotionally-directed or overly optimistic. ISTPs want to know what the systematic changes will be, what the logic is, what new options will open up, and whether or not the direction seems feasible. They also want plenty of time to reflect on a change and assimilate information before jumping on board.

  • Give them time to think through their position before discussing it or expecting an answer.
  • Be realistic and show the facts and data that led to this decision.
  • Explain the logic for the change.
  • Show competence and clarity in your decision-making process.
  • Give them room to adjust goals and plans as the process unfolds.
  • Explain the general parameters.
  • Be flexible and let them present new options.

MBTI Change Readiness self-assessment

MBTI’s ESFJ type

Change can be unnerving for ESFJ individuals. These types enjoy mapping out their future and having all the details worked out so that life is on track to reach their goals. They enjoy consistency, traditions, and fellowship with well-known friends and family members. While they can enjoy the occasional adventure, they still appreciate stability and consistency. Change that is handled with concern, support, and organization can be exciting to them if it leads to a promising future. They just need to feel that their relationships aren’t at stake and that the people in charge will be supportive and competent.

  • Keep lines of communication open. Be honest and forthcoming.
  • Explain the facts and details that led to this decision.
  • Paint a realistic picture of where the change will lead.
  • Respect their feelings and be supportive and appreciative.
  • Show that you have a clear plan and a set deadline.
  • Make expectations, roles, and goals clear.
  • Explain the values that led to the change. Is this an ethical or moral decision?

MBTI Response Style to Change Self-Assessment

MBTI’s ESTJ type

While change isn’t especially exciting for ESTJs, they tend to accept it if the goal is pragmatic and logical. They want

  1. To have a certain amount of control when change occurs and will be irritated if they are expected to just sit around and “let things happen”.
  2. Enjoy organizing, planning, and creating effective systems so that the objectives are met on an agreed-upon timeline.
  3. Although, they will hate change if the people handling it are wishy-washy, vague, or unrealistic in their objectives.
  • Explain the logical reasons for the change.
  • Be open and forthcoming with communication. Don’t beat around the bush.
  • Explain with clarity and real facts why the change has to take place.
  • Discuss the objectives, goals, and vision of where the change will lead.
  • Be specific about what’s needed and what the expectations are.
  • Have a clear timeline set forth and an organized plan of action.
  • Be fair and considerate to everyone involved.

Change Readiness self-assessment

MBTI’s ISFJ type

ISFJs are one of the types least likely to be excited by change. Individuals of this type thrive on stability, consistency, and a sense of routine. They like knowing what to expect and they enjoy working in fields where they have developed expertise and deep knowledge. Having to change, especially if there doesn’t seem to be a strong reason to, can be very stressful for them. That said, ISFJs can appreciate change if it will improve their relationship, their security, or will promote a cause they believe in. They can also enjoy change if they’re given time to prepare themselves for it and acclimate to the idea. Change that is thrust upon them without warning is the most unsettling to them.

MBTI Change Readiness self-assessment

  • Let them know about the change well ahead of time.
  • Be realistic and provide facts that back up your decision.
  • Paint a picture of where the change will lead – but be pragmatic, not fanciful.
  • Give them time to reflect on the change privately before expecting a response.
  • Be very specific about the purpose of the change. Don’t be vague or wishy-washy.
  • Be supportive and explain how people will be taken care of.
  • Give a clear timeline and outline of expectations and goals.

MBTI’s ISTJ type

ISTJs need time to prepare for changes, and can be hesitant of a change initially. They enjoy stability and a sense of the familiar so having to suddenly react to a change can be stressful for them. If there is a strong, logical reason for a change to take place then they will usually get on board and be very helpful and thorough in preparations. But if the change seems poorly-planned, illogical, or impulsive they will be very skeptical and wary of embarking on such a venture. Planning and taking care of details is essential to these types, and if this part of the change-process seems hasty they will be apprehensive about whoever is leading the change.

  • Let them know about the change as early as possible so that they can prepare.
  • Involve them in the process and ask their advice.
  • Give strong, logical reasons for the change to take place.
  • Be very clear about the order of the change (deadlines, expectations, goals).
  • Use facts to back up your reasons for the change.
  • Give them time to process the change privately before expecting a lot of discussion.

Our Other MBTI blogs

DISC personality types

Enneagram personality types

Relationships based upon the MBTI

MBTI fun

MBTI Change Readiness self-assessment

We are assessment specialists in both work and education settings. For more insights into meaningful assessments contact Rob Williams Assessment for a comprehensive appraisal.

Types of intelligence woman with backpack and books thinking

Intelligence Types

Welcome to our Intelligence Types test. This is only meant as a quick educational tool to indicate that you may have unknown intelligence strengths.

A Quick Indicator of Your Intelligence Types

What would your favourite superpower be? A skill that you would like to just have a lot of. Imagine you could learn anything you wanted to, really quickly.

Continue reading Intelligence Types

Personality Test Validation Service

Test validation benefits

The key benefit is the production of a report that highlights those personality factors that are important for success leading to improvements in future recruitment. Other possible benefits include the following:

  • Development of clear decision rules to make recruitment both more efficient and more effective;
  • Information on the areas in which staff are seen as working more effectively or less effectively;
  • How the client’s staff differ in terms of personality from other groups; and
  • Depending on what data is collected, analysis of information relating to fairness and diversity

Incentives, such as discounts on materials, are something that need to be negotiated on a case by case basis – depending on the quality of the data that might be given to us. It is likely that the analysis would be conducted free of charge.

Premium Personality Test Practice

What is validity?

“Convergent” or “construct” validity scientifically checks whether we’re really measuring what we’ve set out to measure.

  • In the case of pre-hire assessments, are we really measuring personality?
  • Are we identifying something else about our test-takers — their reading ability, English fluency, memory, or ability to stick with a task?
  • Are we left with actual personality data, or just a dataset of people who could finish a lengthy questionnaire?

Validation Stages

Personality Test Validation Stage 1

Identify the following:

  • Who should complete the personality. Each participant should be doing a similar role. A sample in excess of 40-50 is required. 
  • What job performance measures should be used and are available from HR. Examples of suitable job performance criteria:
  • sales figures
  • appraisal ratings
  • development or assessment center competency ratings or pass/fail criteria
  • length of service

Personality Test Validation

Stage 2 – Personality Test Validation

An excellent way of obtaining job performance data is to use a managerial Performance Rating form. Managers rate behavioural criteria that are important in their particular role.  Some of the benefits include getting better quality data, getting around the “political” problems of appraisal ratings and covering all aspects of job performance focusing on those which would be more likely to correlate to the 16PF.

At the same time it is worthwhile asking people to rate themselves on the same criteria using a Performance Rating form.

Stage 3 – Personality Test Data Collection

Arrange for identified employees to complete the personality test. Also for their respective managers to complete individual Performance Rating forms.

Final Stage of Personality Test Validation

ROB WILLIAMS ASSESSMENT will conduct all the statistics – requiring a couple of days work – and share the results with the client in the form of a short report – also requiring a couple of days work.

10 personality tips to help your Study Skills

  1. Find time to study – If you manage your time badly, inevitably you will be less productive than if you manage it well. This can lead to increased stress and anxiety levels, especially around exam time.
  2. Keep to a routine – Work in the same place at the same time each day. Also, make sure you have everything you need before you start.
  3. Work to your strengths – Schedule challenging tasks for when you are most alert, and routine ones for when you may be feeling more tired.
  4. Don’t waste time – Rather than reading irrelevant material, skim and scan to help you decide if you need to read something critically and in-depth.
  5. Avoid distractions – Related to above. Switch emails and social media off to prevent your mind wandering while trying to learn new information!
  6. Regularly review your notes – Edit out what you don’t need. Ask yourself the question: “Is this information is relevant to my assignment, and how does it relate to what I already know.”
  7. Vary how you to take notes – For example, use Mind Maps and diagrams to generate ideas and linear notes to focus your ideas for essay or report plans.
  8. Be critical – Make sure that you always add your own comment to every concept or quotation that you write down. Maintain a critical and analytical approach at all times!
  9. Plan your work – If writing an assignment produce a detailed plan before you start to write it. This will make the drafting process much less stressful
  10. Understand different styles  – By understanding different writing styles – such as academic, journal and journalistic styles – you can put what you read into perspective. In particular, you can become more aware of any particular bias.

Our other personality test blogs

Our personality test tips

Financial personality

Bespoke personality test design

Our Culture fit tests

Personality assessment research

Our personality assessments

Values tests

Career Success. Progressive pictures of man on his laptop.

What’s your STEM career resilience?

Your STEM career resilience is a major determinant of your STEM career success.

Your career can be described as a series of jobs that are related to each other and which grow in complexity. Consequently, making educational and career choices are not once-off processes because both jobs and people evolve. For this reason, making these choices should not be seen as an all-or-nothing decision, but rather part of an evolving process. Therefore measuring your career success to a certain job or role would be pointless.

Continue reading What’s your STEM career resilience?
Jobs in Media Studies. Digital marketing. Woman working on laptop.

Digital skills guide

Welcome to our digital marketing jobs listings.

We also offer a short exploration of the latest digital marketing skills.

       


      Welcome to our exploration of digital marketing skills. Plus, the new era job roles for which these specialist marketing skills are most needed,

      We start with one of the most widely publicised, the professional gamer.

      Continue reading Digital skills guide

      Personality Assessment Research

      The focus of this page is personality tests research 2019 and more general personality assessment research.

      Premium Personality Test Practice

      Personality Assessment Research

      Previous projects that have encompassed personality assessment designs:

      • Fit based personality profiles for a call centre
      • CV-based sifting design (finance and business consultancy sectors)
      • Online competency based sift questionnaires

      In 2015 and 2018, Rob Williams Assessment Ltd developed two bespoke personality test designs. These were for the graduate recruiters Talent Window and Hire Window. A positive client recommendation for this project can be found on on Linked-In.

      Firstly, my client Talent Window required a rational model of the personality traits typically sought by graduate employers.

      Recent personality test innovations

      The Bloomberg Financial Test assesses applications for a multitude of financial roles. It is a measure of “financial aptitude” – not a personality test.

      The NEO PI-R personality test established a link between Big 5 personality traits and those personality traits found in successful financial traders. Three key personality domains mentioned in this personality test research: Extroversion, Neuroticism and Openness to Experience.

      Personality research – Assessment designs

      Personality tests vary considerably in length, from short Big Five measures (around 10 minutes) to in-depth measures with 16-32 scales (taking 35-50 minutes). Personality testing is less commonly used at the school-leaver level – compared to the graduate and managerial levels.

      Personality is untimed but takes from 5-6 minutes for a Disc-like instrument to 25 mins for a 16PF.

      Personality research 2019

      Bornstein, R. F. (2003). Behaviorally referenced experimentation
      and symptom validation: A paradigm for 21st-century
      personality disorder research. Journal of Personality Disorders,
      17, 1–18.

      Clark, S. L., Muthn, B., Kaprio, J., D’Onofrio, B. M., Viken,
      R., & Rose, R. J. (2013). Models and strategies for factor
      mixture analysis: An example concerning the structure
      underlying psychological disorders.

      – – – Personality Assessment Research – – –

      Fontana, A., & Rosenbeck, R. (2004). Comparing traditional
      and Rasch analyses of the Mississippi PTSD Scale: Revealing
      limitations of reverse-scored items.

      De Fruyt, F., & Salgado, J. F. (2003). Applied personality
      psychology: Lessons learned from the IWO field. European
      Journal of Personality, 17(S1), S123–S131.

      Dilchert, S., Ones, D. S., & Krueger, R. F. (2014). Maladaptive
      personality constructs, measures, and work behaviors.

      Guenole, N., Levine, S. J., & Chamorro-Premuzic,
      T. (in press). The NEO-PI-R: Factor structure and gender
      invariance from exploratory structural equation modeling
      analyses in a high-stakes setting.

      Ashton, M. C., Cloninger, C. R., & Gough, H. G. (2006).
      The international personality item pool and the future of
      public-domain personality measures. Journal of Research in
      Personality, 40, 84–96.

      Personality research Part III

      Gore, W. L., & Widiger, T. A. (2013). The DSM-5 dimensional
      trait model and five-factor models of general personality.
      Guenole, N. (2014). Maladaptive personality at work: Exploring
      the darkness. Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

      Cockerill, T., Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Smillie,
      L. D. (2011). Evidence for the validity of dimensions in the
      presence of rater source factors.

      Hogan, R., & Hogan, J. (2001). Assessing leadership. A view
      from the dark side.

      Judge, T. A., & LePine, J. A. (2007). The bright and dark sides
      of personality: Implications for personnel selection in
      individual and team contexts.

      Personality assessment research Part IV

      Kolenikov, S., & Bollen, K. A. (2012). Testing negative error
      variances is a Heywood case a symptom of mispecification?

      Krueger, R. F. (1999). The structure of common mental
      disorders.

      Skodol, A. V. (2012). Initial construction of a maladaptive
      personality trait model and inventory for DSM-5.

      Lykken, D. T. (1968). Statistical significance in psychological
      research. Psychological Bulletin, 70, 151–159.

      McDonald, R. P. (1999). Test theory: A unified treatment.

      Muthn, L. K., & Muthn, B. (2006). Mplus: User’s guide.

      O’Boyle, E. H., Forsyth, D. R., Banks, G. C., & McDaniel,
      M. A. (2012). A meta-analysis of the Dark Triad and work
      behavior: A social exchange perspective.

      – – – Personality Assessment Research – – –

      Paulhus, D. L., & Williams, K. (2002). The Dark Triad of
      personality: Narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy.

      Morey, L. C., Verheul, R., Krueger, R. F., & Siever, L. J.
      (2011). Proposed changes in personality and personality
      disorder assessment and diagnosis for DSM-5 Part II:
      Clinical application. Personality Disorders: Theory,
      Research, and Treatment, 2, 23–40.

      Steiger, J. H. (1990). Structural model evaluation and modification:
      An interval estimation approach. Multivariate
      Behavioral Research, 25, 214–12.

      – – – Personality Assessment Research – – –

      Wille, B., De Fruyt, F., & De Clercq, B. (2014). Fifty shades of
      personality: Integrating Five-Factor Model Bright and Dark
      sides of personality at work. Industrial & Organizational
      Psychology, 7, 121–126.

      Woods, M. (2006). Careless responding to reverse-worded items:
      Implications for confirmatory factor analysis. Journal of
      Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 28, 186–191.

      Wright, A. G., Thomas, K. M., Hopwood, C. J., Markon, K. E.,
      Pincus, A. L., & Krueger, R. F. (2012). The hierarchical
      structure of DSM-5 pathological.

      Personality tests research 2019

      Bornstein, R. F. (2003). Behaviorally referenced experimentation
      and symptom validation: A paradigm for 21st-century
      personality disorder research. Journal of Personality Disorders,
      17, 1–18.

      Clark, S. L., Muthn, B., Kaprio, J., D’Onofrio, B. M., Viken,
      R., & Rose, R. J. (2013). Models and strategies for factor
      mixture analysis: An example concerning the structure
      underlying psychological disorders.

      Fontana, A., & Rosenbeck, R. (2004). Comparing traditional
      and Rasch analyses of the Mississippi PTSD Scale: Revealing
      limitations of reverse-scored items.

      De Fruyt, F., & Salgado, J. F. (2003). Applied personality
      psychology: Lessons learned from the IWO field. European
      Journal of Personality, 17(S1), S123–S131.

      Dilchert, S., Ones, D. S., & Krueger, R. F. (2014). Maladaptive
      personality constructs, measures, and work behaviors.

      Guenole, N., Levine, S. J., & Chamorro-Premuzic,
      T. (in press). The NEO-PI-R: Factor structure and gender
      invariance from exploratory structural equation modeling
      analyses in a high-stakes setting.

      Ashton, M. C., Cloninger, C. R., & Gough, H. G. (2006).
      The international personality item pool and the future of
      public-domain personality measures. Journal of Research in
      Personality, 40, 84–96.

      Tests research 2019

      Personality tests research Part III

      Gore, W. L., & Widiger, T. A. (2013). The DSM-5 dimensional
      trait model and five-factor models of general personality.

      Guenole, N. (2014). Maladaptive personality at work: Exploring
      the darkness. Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

      Cockerill, T., Chamorro-Premuzic, T., & Smillie,
      L. D. (2011). Evidence for the validity of dimensions in the
      presence of rater source factors.

      Hogan, R., & Hogan, J. (2001). Assessing leadership. A view
      from the dark side.

      Judge, T. A., & LePine, J. A. (2007). The bright and dark sides
      of personality: Implications for personnel selection in
      individual and team contexts.

      Personality tests research Part IV

      Kolenikov, S., & Bollen, K. A. (2012). Testing negative error
      variances is a Heywood case a symptom of mispecification?

      Krueger, R. F. (1999). The structure of common mental
      disorders.

      Skodol, A. V. (2012). Initial construction of a maladaptive
      personality trait model and inventory for DSM-5.

      Lykken, D. T. (1968). Statistical significance in psychological
      research. Psychological Bulletin, 70, 151–159.

      McDonald, R. P. (1999). Test theory: A unified treatment.

      Muthn, L. K., & Muthn, B. (2006). Mplus: User’s guide.

      O’Boyle, E. H., Forsyth, D. R., Banks, G. C., & McDaniel,
      M. A. (2012). A meta-analysis of the Dark Triad and work
      behavior: A social exchange perspective.

      Personality tests research 2019

      Research Part V

      Paulhus, D. L., & Williams, K. (2002). The Dark Triad of
      personality: Narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy.

      Morey, L. C., Verheul, R., Krueger, R. F., & Siever, L. J.
      (2011). Proposed changes in personality and personality
      disorder assessment and diagnosis for DSM-5 Part II:
      Clinical application. Personality Disorders: Theory,
      Research, and Treatment, 2, 23–40.

      Steiger, J. H. (1990). Structural model evaluation and modification:
      An interval estimation approach. Multivariate
      Behavioral Research, 25, 214–12.

      Wille, B., De Fruyt, F., & De Clercq, B. (2014). Fifty shades of
      personality: Integrating Five-Factor Model Bright and Dark
      sides of personality at work. Industrial & Organizational
      Psychology, 7, 121–126.

      Woods, M. (2006). Careless responding to reverse-worded items:
      Implications for confirmatory factor analysis. Journal of
      Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 28, 186–191.

      Wright, A. G., Thomas, K. M., Hopwood, C. J., Markon, K. E.,
      Pincus, A. L., & Krueger, R. F. (2012). The hierarchical
      structure of DSM-5 pathological.

      Extra Psychometric Test Practice

      Social Desirability Personality Research 2019

      Anguiano-Carrasco, C., MacCann, C., Geiger, M., Seybert, J.
      M., & Roberts, R. D. (2014). Development of a forcedchoice
      measure of typical-performance emotional intelligence.
      Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 33, 83-97.
       
      Bartram, D. (2007). Increasing validity with forced-choice
      criterion measurement formats. International Journal of
      Selection and Assessment, 15, 263-272. doi:10.1111/j.1468-
       
      Funder, D. C. (1995). On the accuracy of personality judgment: A
      realistic approach. Psychological Review, 102, 652-670.
      Personality, 81, 155-170.
       
      Colvin, C. R., Block, J., & Funder, D. C. (1995). Overly positive
      self-evaluations and personality: Negative implications for
      mental health. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,
       
      Funder, D. C. (1995). On the accuracy of personality judgment: A
      realistic approach. Psychological Review, 102, 652-670.
       
      Jin, K. Y., & Wang, W. C. (2014). Generalized IRT models for
      extreme response style. Educational and Psychological
       
      Joubert, T., Inceoglu, I., Bartram, D., Dowdeswell, K., & Lin, Y.
      (2015). A comparison of the psychometric properties of the
      forced choice and Likert scale versions of a personality instrument.
      International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 23,
       
      Khorramdel, L., & von Davier, M. (2014). Measuring response
      styles across the Big Five: A multiscale extension of an
      approach using multinomial processing trees. Multivariate
      Behavioral Research, 49, 161-177. doi:10.1080/00273171.
      Messick, S. J. (1967). The psychology of acquiescence: An interpretation
      of research evidence. In I. A. Berg (Ed.), Response
      set in personality assessment (pp. 115-145). Chicago, IL:
       
      Paulhus, D. L. (2002). Socially desirable responding: The evolution
      of a construct. In H. I. Braun, D. N. Jackson, & D. E.

      Verbal Reasoning practice test book

      41b7m573tbl
      Firstly, Passing Verbal Reasoning Tests book by Rob Williams

      Numerical Reasoning practice test book

      Secondly, Passing Numerical Reasoning Tests book by Rob Williams

      10 personality tips to help your Study Skills

      1. Find time to study – If you manage your time badly, inevitably you will be less productive than if you manage it well. This can lead to increased stress and anxiety levels, especially around exam time.
      2. Keep to a routine – Work in the same place at the same time each day. Also, make sure you have everything you need before you start.
      3. Work to your strengths – Schedule challenging tasks for when you are most alert, and routine ones for when you may be feeling more tired.
      4. Don’t waste time – Rather than reading irrelevant material, skim and scan to help you decide if you need to read something critically and in-depth.
      5. Avoid distractions – Related to above. Switch emails and social media off to prevent your mind wandering while trying to learn new information!
      6. Regularly review your notes – Edit out what you don’t need. Ask yourself the question: “Is this information is relevant to my assignment, and how does it relate to what I already know.”
      7. Vary how you to take notes – For example, use Mind Maps and diagrams to generate ideas and linear notes to focus your ideas for essay or report plans.
      8. Be critical – Make sure that you always add your own comment to every concept or quotation that you write down. Maintain a critical and analytical approach at all times!
      9. Plan your work – If writing an assignment produce a detailed plan before you start to write it. This will make the drafting process much less stressful
      10. Understand different styles  – By understanding different writing styles – such as academic, journal and journalistic styles – you can put what you read into perspective. In particular, you can become more aware of any particular bias.

      Our other personality test blogs

      Our personality test tips

      Financial personality

      Bespoke personality test design

      Our Culture fit tests

      Our personality assessments

      Personality test validation service

      Our values tests

      – – – Personality Assessment Research – – –

      MAP test practice

      Culture Fit

      Welcome to our values test design feature, which includes our NHS values fit match and remote workers job search.

      Are you considering working as an NHS doctor, or an NHS nurse? You can get a quick oveview of your values fit using our free NHS values fit match tool.

      Our other psychometric test design specialities 

      Work Values Fit Tests

      We specialise in several types of culture fit and work values fit tests:

      1. Values fit – useful measure for startup selection processes
      2. Personality fit – similar to cultural fit
      3. Team fit
      4. Career fit
      5. Personality work values tests
      6. Fit designs for matching corporate values to personal values
      7. Situational Values Fit Designs

      What is organizational culture?

      Culture should be integrated into every aspect of business strategy, and at the heart of culture lies employees. The frontline between a company and its customers should be people who love their jobs, care about customer satisfaction and promote overall company success. Employees are a brand’s first customers and best advocates, and company culture is the key to keeping them engaged. 

      Create a trusting culture

      • Brands need to generate and sustain a culture of believers and advocates, which comes from building trust.
      • Leadership behaviors can start this process, but it is the mission of strong culture to establish trust among all levels.
      • Employees want their company’s mission to align with their personal values. If they believe in your goals, they will support your success.
      • People work and behave better as a team when they trust that everyone is on the same page. 
      • Building trust is the key to greater employee engagement, which has a direct impact on customer satisfaction.

      Get an emotional commitment from your employees

      • Engaged employees need to feel confident that they belong and are important to the company, so go the extra mile and show them that you care.
      • Take the time to know each individual employee on a more personal level and take a genuine interest in his or her success. 
      • Nurture an emotional commitment with your employees with rewards and recognition beyond pay increases and promotions.
      • Employees want to feel a sense of ownership and that their input can make a genuine impact, so reaffirm their areas of strength and encourage their innovation.
      • When they trust that they have a home to grow within a company, they go the extra mile to excel for themselves, their coworkers and the business as a whole.

      Inspire employee engagement

      • This generates both commitment and connection, intellectually and emotionally.
      • Highly engaged employees are motivated to succeed, to help others and inspire them to do their best. They also become highly persuasive advocates for the brand who help meet company goals faster.
      • Whilst, disengaged employees need you to offer them some sort of plan for re-engagement.
      • Since, employees don’t quit jobs, they quit managers, so start by coaching and training great management.
      • Always ensure to first provide disengaged employees with all the resources, tools and data they need for best practice.
      • Plus, you should also make engagement a key performance indicator to hold managers accountable.

       

      1) Personality work values fit tests

      1. Values fit – useful measure for startup selection processes
      2. Personality fit – similar to cultural fit
      3. Team fit
      4. Career fit
      5. Personality work values tests
      6. Fit designs for matching corporate values to personal values
      7. Situational Values Fit Designs

      Rob Williams Assessment Ltd has experience of designing personality values tests that are generic in nature.

      2) Matching corporate values to personal values

      Alternatively, specific values test which assesses a company’s values. Hence, an individual’s fit between their personal values and their work’s organisational values. Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are often used to measure values. Also, the fit with a company’s values.

      •  3-4 scenarios to assess each value.
      • Totalling approx. 15-16 questions.
      • Provides accurate and meaningful feedback to each respondent.

      3) Values based situational judgement tests 

      Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

      At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

      Work Values – Interview

      A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

      Work Values – Simulation Exercises

      • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
      • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
      • Minimise the risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
      • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

      Work Values Fit Tests

      3) Situational judgement tests – values

      Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

      At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

      Values-Based Interview

      A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

      Values-Based Simulation Exercises

      • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
      • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
      • Minimise risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
      • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

      Work Values Fit Tests

       

      What are your personal values? Here are some questions to prompt exploration of your personal values:

      • 1 – When you need inspiration what do you do?
      • 2 – Which goals are you most proud of in your life to date?
      • 3 – What do you think about during your spare time?
      • 4 – Which subjects do you read about in your spare time?
      • 5 – In which activities do you lose your sense of time?
      • 6 – In which areas do you have the strongest reputation?
      • 7 – What to you choose to buy with your disposable income?
      • 8 – Which tasks come much easier to you than to other people?
      • 9 – What are your main activities in your spare time?

      Universal Values model (Schwatz)

      • Hedonism value
      • Tradition value
      • Achievement value
      • Universalism value
      • Benevolence value
      • Self-Direction value
      • Security value
      • Conformity value
      • Power value
      • Stimulation value

      Benevolence: honest, kind, forgiving, responsible.

      Universalism: equality, wisdom, beauty, environmentalist.

      Self-Direction: creative thinking, independence, choosing own goals, intellectually curious.

      Security: Safety, family focus, friendship / belonging.

      Conformity: Restraint of impulses, self-discipline, being polite, respecting others.

      Hedonism: Enjoying life’s pleasures.

      Achievement: Ambition, capabilities, success, influence.

      Tradition: Respect, commitment.

      Stimulation: Novelty, challenges, variety, daring.