Culture Fit

Welcome to our values test design feature, which includes our NHS values fit match and remote workers job search.

Are you considering working as an NHS doctor, or an NHS nurse? You can get a quick oveview of your values fit using our free NHS values fit match tool.

Our other psychometric test design specialities 

Work Values Fit Tests

We specialise in several types of culture fit and work values fit tests:

  • Values fit – useful measure for startup selection processes
  • Personality fit – similar to cultural fit
  • Team fit
  • Career fit
  • Personality work values tests
  • Fit designs for matching corporate values to personal values
  • Situational Values Fit Designs

1) Personality work values fit tests

Rob Williams Assessment Ltd has experience of designing personality values tests that are generic in nature.

2) Matching corporate values to personal values

Alternatively, specific values test which assesses a company’s values. Hence, an individual’s fit between their personal values and their work’s organisational values. Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are often used to measure values. Also, the fit with a company’s values.

  •  3-4 scenarios to assess each value.
  • Totalling approx. 15-16 questions.
  • Provides accurate and meaningful feedback to each respondent.

3) Values based situational judgement tests 

Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

Work Values – Interview

A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

Work Values – Simulation Exercises

  • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
  • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
  • Minimise the risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
  • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

Work Values Fit Tests

3) Situational judgement tests – values

Typically a situational judgement test uses problem-solving and judgment skills to measure role-specific competencies. In particular, those role characteristics which are difficult to assess at interview or in an assessment centre. For example, empathy and resilience in customer-facing customer service roles.

At a higher level than the role, bespoke SJTs can also be designed to assess organisational “fit”. How well an individual’s values and attitudes match those of the organisation. The rationale is that this is an assessment of whether or not the individual “fits” into the organisational culture.

Values-Based Interview

A structured interview(s) comprising firstly values questions. Secondly, comprising of competency questions, and finally, including technical questions.

Values-Based Simulation Exercises

  • Scenarios from the job analysis can be used to design simulation exercises.
  • Parallel version developed to maximise exercise integrity.
  • Minimise risk of applicants sharing details of tools.
  • Compromising the validity of the assessment process.

Work Values Fit Tests

 

What are your personal values? Here are some questions to prompt exploration of your personal values:

  • 1 – When you need inspiration what do you do?
  • 2 – Which goals are you most proud of in your life to date?
  • 3 – What do you think about during your spare time?
  • 4 – Which subjects do you read about in your spare time?
  • 5 – In which activities do you lose your sense of time?
  • 6 – In which areas do you have the strongest reputation?
  • 7 – What to you choose to buy with your disposable income?
  • 8 – Which tasks come much easier to you than to other people?
  • 9 – What are your main activities in your spare time?

Universal Values model (Schwatz)

  • Hedonism value
  • Tradition value
  • Achievement value
  • Universalism value
  • Benevolence value
  • Self-Direction value
  • Security value
  • Conformity value
  • Power value
  • Stimulation value

Benevolence: honest, kind, forgiving, responsible.

Universalism: equality, wisdom, beauty, environmentalist.

Self-Direction: creative thinking, independence, choosing own goals, intellectually curious.

Security: Safety, family focus, friendship / belonging.

Conformity: Restraint of impulses, self-discipline, being polite, respecting others.

Hedonism: Enjoying life’s pleasures.

Achievement: Ambition, capabilities, success, influence.

Tradition: Respect, commitment.

Stimulation: Novelty, challenges, variety, daring.