Employability Test Profiler

Here we describe the development of our employability test profiler.

This is a baseline Employability Skills Test designed to assess a learners ‘job readiness’ and where their learning needs are. Thereby aiding individual curriculum planning and an FE College’s overall curriculum planning. BESTest also assesses the positive difference made by learning programme interventions in terms of specific employability skills.

How best to use BESTest to prepare learners for Apprenticeships is shown in this YouTube video.  This YouTube video describes how the new Baseline Employability Skills Test which will enable you to:
– Accurately track and evidence distance travelled within ‘Employability’; and
– Provide individualised learning plans based on learners strengths and weaknesses.

Employability Test Profiler – Analyse your employability skills

Soft skills are critical in today’s workplace. The term employability characteristics refers to a cluster of productive personality traits that characterize one’s suitability for working effectively – including with other people. Employability characteristics, or soft employability skills can include social graces, communication skills, cognitive agility, emotional intelligence, resilience, empathy, time management, teamwork and leadership traits.

Hard skills, or technical skills, were the only skills necessary for career employment and were generally quantifiable and measurable from educational background, work experience or through interview.

How to do well on different types of pre-employment tests 

Pre-employment tests are used by many companies as a standard part of the recruitment process. If you’re currently applying for jobs, you’re likely to face psychometric testing. Both personality assessment and some of the most commonly used aptitude tests. These measure numerical, verbal and logical reasoning.

How you perform matters. Nearly 90 percent of companies said they would reject candidates if the test showed them to be deficient in basic skills, according to a survey by the American Management Association. 

Companies use pre-employment tests to identify which candidates are most likely to perform well on the job, potentially saving time and cost in the recruitment process and decreasing employee turnover. Skills tests are used to verify whether a candidate has the skills they say they have, and are proficient enough to do the job. Skills test are specific to the job – for example a design challenge using Photoshop for graphic designers or a proof reading test for editors. Aptitude tests are more general and are used to evaluate an applicant’s ability to learn new skills and indicate how they may react to different situations once hired. 
 
Employers may ask you to take a test – often delivered online at home – after you’ve made an initial application or may invite you to an assessment centre after a successful interview.

How to do well on numerical reasoning tests

The general advice given is typically that some focussed test practice will improve your score. Unfortunately, there aren’t any quick wins for being good at Maths.

  • Give your “first response”. Don’t second guess what is being looked for since “faking” and lying are easily picked up.
  • As a timed test you need to average around one minute per question. Work briskly but accurately.
  • Each question counts the same so pick off the easy ones first and don’t waste your test time on the most difficult questions.
  • Practise some of the most common numerical test types at the main test publisher websites. For this reason alone, we strongly advise practising sample questions from Kenexa-IBM, TalentQ and SHL sites. ensure that you are comfortable using data tables, interpreting graphs and manipulating large financial figures.

How to do well on verbal reasoning tests

These come in many different types of format. The traditional comprehension format is to have a short text passage followed by a series of questions about facts, opinions, conclusions from the passage content. A bit like those English tests in primary school where you answered questions on a novel extract. Regardless of the type of test, it’s vital to remember:

  • To carefully read each question. Often questions hinge on 1-2 key words so you must take more care to interpret these accurately.
  • If questioned whether something “always” applies whilst the passage states that it is “sometimes” the case, then this is a false interpretation.
  • One useful strategy is to scan the passage initially, then to read it in more detail.
  • It’s more efficient as you answer each question if you can recall roughly where to find the answer in the passage.

How to do well on abstract reasoning tests

Abstract reasoning tests ask you to look for the changing pattern(s) in the “pictures”. The easier questions typically at the start of the test, will involve one change in colour, position, size etc of the figures shown.

Questions become more difficult as you must spot two or three changes in any of the features shown. It can help, once you’ve worked out at least one of the feature changes, to check through the answer options to discount those that do not conform said feature changes.
 
As always, test practice and your familiarity with the test format help – with these tests you are strongly advised to learn the range of possible feature changes. leading test publishers Kenexa-IBM and TalentQ have excellent sample questions for you to practise any of these test types. Alongside SHL’s practise test pages these three sites cover most of the psychometric tests you are likely to find. You can ask in advance which test publisher’s test you will take.

You can find more detailed advice in our non verbal reasoning test article for City Kids online magazine.

Employability Test Profiler Research

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Employability test profiler

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Employability test profiler

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Links to Additional Employability Test Profiler Resources

Useful Personality Test Links

Employability test profiler